The Soviet Economic Decline

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Abstract of Paper
Soviet growth over 1960-89 was the worst in the world after we control for investment and capital; the relative performance worsens over time. There is some evidence that the burden of defense spending modestly contributed to the Soviet debacle. The declining Soviet growth rate over 1950-87 can be accounted for by a declining marginal product of capital with a constant rate of TFP growth. The Soviet reliance on extensive growth (rising capital to output ratios) was no greater than that of market economies like Japan and Korea, but low elasticity of substitution between capital and labor implied especially acute diminishing returns to capital compared to market economies.

Datasets
All data are annual. They are given both in MicroTSP DB file format and as Lotus files. The data set is divided into two directories:
"USSR", which contains specific variables for the 1928-1987 period.
"Republic", which contains specific variables over 1970-1990 period.

Type: 
Other
Topics: 
Economic Growth
Economy Coverage: 
Upper Middle Income
Languages Supported: 
English
Number of Economies: 
1
Geographical Coverage: 
Russian Federation
External Contact Email: 
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Publication: The Soviet Economic Decline

Easterly, William and Stanley Fisher, "The Soviet Economic Decline: Historical and Republican Data" World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Number 1284, April 2001. Also published in the World Bank Economic Review 9(3): 341-371, 1995.

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Easterly, William and Stanley Fisher, "The Soviet Economic Decline: Historical and Republican Data" World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Number 1284, April 2001. Also published in the World Bank Economic Review 9(3): 341-371, 1995.

Abstract of Paper
Soviet growth over 1960-89 was the worst in the world after we control for investment and capital; the relative performance worsens over time. There is some evidence that the burden of defense spending modestly contributed to the Soviet debacle. The declining Soviet growth rate over 1950-87 can be accounted for by a declining marginal product of capital with a constant rate of TFP growth. The Soviet reliance on extensive growth (rising capital to output ratios) was no greater than that of market economies like Japan and Korea, but low elasticity of substitution between capital and labor implied especially acute diminishing returns to capital compared to market economies.

Datasets
All data are annual. They are given both in MicroTSP DB file format and as Lotus files. The data set is divided into two directories:
"USSR", which contains specific variables for the 1928-1987 period.
"Republic", which contains specific variables over 1970-1990 period.

FieldValue
Modified Date
2018-09-14
Release Date
Periodicity
Periodicity not specified
Identifier
cb01c574-625d-47b5-97d4-786cfa85efeb
License
License Not Specified
Contact Email
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Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Economy Coverage: 
Number of Economies: 
1
Update Frequency: 
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Source Type: 
DEC
Programatic Region: 
External Contact Email: 
Granularity: 
Citation Text: 
Easterly, William and Stanley Fisher, "The Soviet Economic Decline: Historical and Republican Data" World Bank Policy Research Working Paper Number 1284, April 2001. Also published in the World Bank Economic Review 9(3): 341-371, 1995.
Modified date: 
96
Primary Dataset: 
Yes
Source: 

World Bank Group

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