Tajikistan - Survey of Conflict Prevention and Cooperation 2004

The project uses public opinion polling to gather and then analyze a sample that represents the entire population of each of four different countries of Central Asia: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan.

Acronym: 
SCPC 2004
Type: 
Microdata
Topics: 
Topic not specified
Languages Supported: 
English
Geographical Coverage: 
Tajikistan
Reference ID: 
TJK_2004_SCPC_v01_M
Release Date: 
April 6, 2018

Harvest Source

Harvest Source: 
Microdata

Harvest Source ID

Harvest Source ID: 
9735

Last Updated

Last Updated: 
April 6, 2018
Funding Name, Abbreviation, Role: 
The World Bank
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
The Brookings Institution
Questionnaires: 
To perform questioning, the following documents have been prepared (attached): - Questionnaire (in Tajik and Russian languages). - Sets of cards (in Tajik and Russian languages). - Forms of the respondent' sampling and of households' visits records with Kish's cards (in Tajik and Russian languages). - Forms of the households' sampling in selected points of questioning (in Russian language). - Sampling instructions (in Tajik and Russian languages). - Instructions on households and respondents' sampling (in Russian and Tajik languages). - Examples how fill out sampling forms - Covering letter to local authorities and ID cards for interviewers (in Russian and Tajik languages).
Response Rates: 
During the fieldwork, 88 cases of nonresponse were observed. The average response rate is about 94% (1,500 of 1,588 cases - due to using the sequential sampling of households the nonresponse had no effect on the final sample size). Generally, nonresponse was registered if a completed interview had not taken place, and an interviewer had made up to 3 callbacks. The response rate was 84.4% in urban areas and 98.9% in rural ones. In Dushanbe the response rate was 73.3%. Two-thirds (67.1%) of urban non-responses came from respondents not being at home; few emphatic refusals to participate were noted in Tajikistan.According to the interviewers, the main (in the majority of cases) refusal was occupation (work). If in town its inhabitants spend the whole day at work, in village this is caused by cotton gathering season. Most refusals were due to the households or respondent's straightforward refusals to give an interview. Like in Uzbekistan or in other countries, these refusals are partially generated by insufficient capability of interviewers to persuade household or respondent to agree for conversation. The same goes for other household members' refusal to contact a required respondent. Plain and direct refusals are characteristic of urban population. In the next surveys we are envisaging particularly scrupulous training for interviewers, who will work in towns.
Sampling Procedure: 
For all four Central Asian countries in this survey, the sampling procedure is a three-stage stratified clustered one. Census data on the territorial dispersion of the population is used as the base to start the sampling methodology. The sampling procedure takes the total population of the country, considers geographic units within the country as either urban or rural, and then develops random procedures to select who to survey in three stages: first by randomly selected smaller geographic urban and units in each province (the primary sampling units or PSUs), second randomly chosing households within these units, and third, to randomly select which household member to interview in each household. The sampling frame used to divide these four countries into smaller geographic units to randomly sample from differs slightly for each Central Asian country, based on differences in data availability on the population of the country and its dispersion. Subsequent sections explain the sampling methodology used and how this sampling frame differs in each country. Then all four countries have PSUs, random selection of households, and random sampling of individuals within households using the same methods. Tajikistan has 4 provinces, with the city of Dushanbe then considered a separate fifth province. These provinces have 58 districts, with 17 cities and 7 settlements ("posyolok") of provincal submission. Districts incorporate rural settlements or villages, which are incorporated into rural districts ("djamoat dekhot" and "poselkovyi djamoat"). In total there are 23 cities (17 cities of provincal submission and 6 cities of district submission), 47 settlements (7 settlements of provincal submission and 40 settlements of district submission), 356 djamoat and 3,803 villages. The population of Tajikistan was 6,187,561 people, of whom 1,686,095 (27%) were urban, and 4,501,466 (73%) were rural as of January 20, 2000. Several remote or inaccessible districts were excluded from the sample from since they are practically impossible to get to due to their remote location or absence of transportation. These are three districts in Sogd province, that have a population of 248,290 people, which is 0.1% o f the urban population of the country and 5.5% of the rural population - a total of 4.01% percent of the country. The sampling frame for Tajikistan is based on the list of small territorial units (primary sampling units - PSUs) of three types: - Villages - rural settlements subordinate to djamoats, each is a separate PSU. - Parts of large rural settlements, divided into populations of between 2,504 and 4,835 inhabitants as separate PSUs. - Parts of large urban settlements, divided into populations of between 2,450 and 4,903 inhabitants as separate PSUs. - Like Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, the sampling is three-stage stratified clustered sampling for Tajikistan. First, proportionate stratification is done by the population of provinces, with proportionate stratification by urban/rural population within provinces (except the city of Dushanbe which is all urban) and then a PPS-sampling of PSUs within these urban and rural strata. Second, sequential random sampling of households (Secondary Sampling Units - SSUs) is done in selected PSUs. Third, Kish grids are used to sample respondents within households. For Tajikistan, 56 PSUs are randomly selected from the sampling frame, and between 7 people (for urban areas in Gorno-Badakhshan, which is a tiny proportion of the urban population of the country) and 29 respondent interviewed in each. The sample distribution of the main demographic characteristics can be compared with census data from 1989 (with data from 2000 used instead in the nationality section). These data have changed substantially over fifteen years and the dramatic change in the economy, society, and polity with the civil war and other changes that have accompanied independence. The data are weighted, which somewhat reduces the typical disproportionate probability of selection of men and youth. In comparison with the 2000 census nationality data, the number of Uzbeks has grown and the number of people of other nationalities (especially Russians) has appreciably diminished. This is due to high levels of unemployment and increased migration of Tajik men to Russia for work and, on the contrary, the settled way of life of many Uzbeks who have remained in agriculture. Second, census data overestimates the proportion of the titular nationality since belonging to this nation provides advantages in employment, careers, and education. In opinion polls, when no supporting documentation is required, respondents preferred to name their ethnicity as that which they actually identify themselves.
Study Type: 
Opinion survey
Version Description: 
Data provided to the World Bank by The Brookings Institution on January 31, 2006

No Visualizations Available.

Tajikistan Survey of Conflict Prevention and Cooperation 2004, Ref. KAZ_2004_SCPC_v01_M, dataset downloaded from microdata.worldbank.org on [date]

The project uses public opinion polling to gather and then analyze a sample that represents the entire population of each of four different countries of Central Asia: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan.

Dataset Info

These fields are compatible with DCAT, an RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between data catalogs published on the Web.
FieldValue
Modified Date
2018-04-09
Release Date
December 31,1969
Identifier
d7ca0fff-2c7a-43d3-bc63-46954e8735ea
License
License Not Specified
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Reference ID: 
TJK_2004_SCPC_v01_M
Acronym: 
SCPC 2004
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Response Rates: 
During the fieldwork, 88 cases of nonresponse were observed. The average response rate is about 94% (1,500 of 1,588 cases - due to using the sequential sampling of households the nonresponse had no effect on the final sample size). Generally, nonresponse was registered if a completed interview had not taken place, and an interviewer had made up to 3 callbacks. The response rate was 84.4% in urban areas and 98.9% in rural ones. In Dushanbe the response rate was 73.3%. Two-thirds (67.1%) of urban non-responses came from respondents not being at home; few emphatic refusals to participate were noted in Tajikistan.According to the interviewers, the main (in the majority of cases) refusal was occupation (work). If in town its inhabitants spend the whole day at work, in village this is caused by cotton gathering season. Most refusals were due to the households or respondent's straightforward refusals to give an interview. Like in Uzbekistan or in other countries, these refusals are partially generated by insufficient capability of interviewers to persuade household or respondent to agree for conversation. The same goes for other household members' refusal to contact a required respondent. Plain and direct refusals are characteristic of urban population. In the next surveys we are envisaging particularly scrupulous training for interviewers, who will work in towns.
Time Periods: 
April, 2018
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
The Brookings Institution
Version Description: 
Data provided to the World Bank by The Brookings Institution on January 31, 2006
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Sampling Procedure: 
For all four Central Asian countries in this survey, the sampling procedure is a three-stage stratified clustered one. Census data on the territorial dispersion of the population is used as the base to start the sampling methodology. The sampling procedure takes the total population of the country, considers geographic units within the country as either urban or rural, and then develops random procedures to select who to survey in three stages: first by randomly selected smaller geographic urban and units in each province (the primary sampling units or PSUs), second randomly chosing households within these units, and third, to randomly select which household member to interview in each household. The sampling frame used to divide these four countries into smaller geographic units to randomly sample from differs slightly for each Central Asian country, based on differences in data availability on the population of the country and its dispersion. Subsequent sections explain the sampling methodology used and how this sampling frame differs in each country. Then all four countries have PSUs, random selection of households, and random sampling of individuals within households using the same methods. Tajikistan has 4 provinces, with the city of Dushanbe then considered a separate fifth province. These provinces have 58 districts, with 17 cities and 7 settlements ("posyolok") of provincal submission. Districts incorporate rural settlements or villages, which are incorporated into rural districts ("djamoat dekhot" and "poselkovyi djamoat"). In total there are 23 cities (17 cities of provincal submission and 6 cities of district submission), 47 settlements (7 settlements of provincal submission and 40 settlements of district submission), 356 djamoat and 3,803 villages. The population of Tajikistan was 6,187,561 people, of whom 1,686,095 (27%) were urban, and 4,501,466 (73%) were rural as of January 20, 2000. Several remote or inaccessible districts were excluded from the sample from since they are practically impossible to get to due to their remote location or absence of transportation. These are three districts in Sogd province, that have a population of 248,290 people, which is 0.1% o f the urban population of the country and 5.5% of the rural population - a total of 4.01% percent of the country. The sampling frame for Tajikistan is based on the list of small territorial units (primary sampling units - PSUs) of three types: - Villages - rural settlements subordinate to djamoats, each is a separate PSU. - Parts of large rural settlements, divided into populations of between 2,504 and 4,835 inhabitants as separate PSUs. - Parts of large urban settlements, divided into populations of between 2,450 and 4,903 inhabitants as separate PSUs. - Like Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan, the sampling is three-stage stratified clustered sampling for Tajikistan. First, proportionate stratification is done by the population of provinces, with proportionate stratification by urban/rural population within provinces (except the city of Dushanbe which is all urban) and then a PPS-sampling of PSUs within these urban and rural strata. Second, sequential random sampling of households (Secondary Sampling Units - SSUs) is done in selected PSUs. Third, Kish grids are used to sample respondents within households. For Tajikistan, 56 PSUs are randomly selected from the sampling frame, and between 7 people (for urban areas in Gorno-Badakhshan, which is a tiny proportion of the urban population of the country) and 29 respondent interviewed in each. The sample distribution of the main demographic characteristics can be compared with census data from 1989 (with data from 2000 used instead in the nationality section). These data have changed substantially over fifteen years and the dramatic change in the economy, society, and polity with the civil war and other changes that have accompanied independence. The data are weighted, which somewhat reduces the typical disproportionate probability of selection of men and youth. In comparison with the 2000 census nationality data, the number of Uzbeks has grown and the number of people of other nationalities (especially Russians) has appreciably diminished. This is due to high levels of unemployment and increased migration of Tajik men to Russia for work and, on the contrary, the settled way of life of many Uzbeks who have remained in agriculture. Second, census data overestimates the proportion of the titular nationality since belonging to this nation provides advantages in employment, careers, and education. In opinion polls, when no supporting documentation is required, respondents preferred to name their ethnicity as that which they actually identify themselves.
Release Date: 
Friday, April 6, 2018
Last Updated Date: 
Friday, April 6, 2018
Questionnaires: 
To perform questioning, the following documents have been prepared (attached): - Questionnaire (in Tajik and Russian languages). - Sets of cards (in Tajik and Russian languages). - Forms of the respondent' sampling and of households' visits records with Kish's cards (in Tajik and Russian languages). - Forms of the households' sampling in selected points of questioning (in Russian language). - Sampling instructions (in Tajik and Russian languages). - Instructions on households and respondents' sampling (in Russian and Tajik languages). - Examples how fill out sampling forms - Covering letter to local authorities and ID cards for interviewers (in Russian and Tajik languages).
Harvest Source: 
Harvest Source ID: 
9735
Citation Text: 
Tajikistan Survey of Conflict Prevention and Cooperation 2004, Ref. KAZ_2004_SCPC_v01_M, dataset downloaded from microdata.worldbank.org on [date]
Modified date: 
17627
Study Type: 
Opinion survey
Primary Dataset: 
Yes

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