South Africa - Evaluation of the National Adherence Guidelines for Chronic Diseases 2016, A Cluster-Randomised Evaluation

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This dataset was used in the preparation of the report: “Adherence Clubs and Decentralized Medication Delivery to Support Retention and Sustained Viral Suppression: Results from a Cluster Randomized Evaluation of Differentiated ART delivery models in South Africa” presenting the evaluation results of two interventions which were assessed in the context of an impact evaluation of five differentiated HIV care and adherence interventions in 24 South African facilities. The South African Government implemented Chronic Disease Adherence Guidelines, including adherence clubs (AC) and decentralized medication delivery (DMD). We compared those receiving AC/DMD at intervention sites to those eligible for AC/DMD at control sites. Outcomes were retention and sustained viral suppression ( 400 copies/mL) 12 months after AC/DMD enrolment (or comparable time for controls). Twelve facilities were randomly allocated to intervention and 12 to control arms. We saw comparable DMD outcomes vs. standard of care at facilities, an AC retention benefit and retention and sustained suppression benefits amongst men. This suggests the importance of alternative service delivery models for men and of community-based strategies to decongest primary healthcare facilities. As these strategies also reduce patient inconvenience and decongest clinics, comparable outcomes are a success.

Type: 
Microdata
Acronym: 
NAGCD 2016
Languages Supported: 
English
Topics: 
Topic not specified
Geographical Coverage: 
South Africa
Economy Coverage: 
Economy Coverage not specified
Release Date: 
June 25, 2019

Last Updated

Last Updated: 
June 25, 2019

Harvest System ID

Harvest System ID: 
Microdata

Harvest Source ID

Harvest Source ID: 
10470
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Version Description: 
Version 01 (June 2019)
Publisher Name: 

Development Economics Data Group; The World Bank

Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Matthew P.Fox; Boston University School of Public Health, Sophie J. Pascoe; University of the Witwatersrand, Amy N. Huber; University of the Witwatersrand, Joshua Murphy; University of the Witwatersrand, Mokgadi Phokojoe; National Department of Health, Pretoria, South Africa, Marelize Gorgens; The World Bank Group, Washington DC, Sydney Rosen; Boston University School of Public Health, David Wilson; The World Bank Group, Washington DC, Yogan Pillay; National Department of Health, Pretoria, South Africa, Nicole Fraser-Hurt; The World Bank Group, Washington DC
Sampling Procedure: 
Selection and randomisation of study sites The evaluation is being conducted at 24 PHCs in South Africa. All study sites follow the current guidelines for HIV care and treatment, dated December 2014. Six clinics were chosen from one district each in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and North West Provinces. These provinces were chosen in consultation with NDOH to represent high HIV burden regions with high-burden districts and high-volume clinics. The study team developed a list of all sites in each participating province that met these criteria and selected three matched pairs of clinics per province. Pairs were matched on ART patient volume (1000-1999, 2000-4999, or =5000 current ART patients), setting (urban, informal settlement, or rural), location (pairs should be located relatively nearby one another) and HIV viral suppression rate (see table 2 of the report). In each pair, one clinic was randomly assigned (using a computer-generated randomisation) to receive early implementation of the minimum package of interventions, while the other continued to provide standard of care. No blinding was used. Table 4 of the report provided under Related Materials shows the sample size that is required to detect meaningful differences for objectives 1-5. Sample sizes were determined using PASS software for cluster-randomised designs. Each sample size was determined to measure our short-term outcome for the objective. All calculations assume a site-clustered design with the clinic as the cluster and 24 clusters evenly split between intervention and comparison groups. We assumed power of 80% and an alpha of 0.05. Sample sizes accounted for the cluster-randomised design by assuming a coefficient of variation of 0.1. Each sample size was calculated assuming a baseline proportion of patients achieving the outcome in the absence of the intervention as determined from the literature or experience. Sample sizes were calculated based on being able to detect an absolute increase on outcomes deemed to be clinically meaningful, ranging from 15% to 20% as determined by consensus of the investigators. The total sample size was calculated to be 3456 including all of the five HIV cohorts.

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Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download

This dataset was used in the preparation of the report: “Adherence Clubs and Decentralized Medication Delivery to Support Retention and Sustained Viral Suppression: Results from a Cluster Randomized Evaluation of Differentiated ART delivery models in South Africa” presenting the evaluation results of two interventions which were assessed in the context of an impact evaluation of five differentiated HIV care and adherence interventions in 24 South African facilities. The South African Government implemented Chronic Disease Adherence Guidelines, including adherence clubs (AC) and decentralized medication delivery (DMD). We compared those receiving AC/DMD at intervention sites to those eligible for AC/DMD at control sites. Outcomes were retention and sustained viral suppression ( 400 copies/mL) 12 months after AC/DMD enrolment (or comparable time for controls). Twelve facilities were randomly allocated to intervention and 12 to control arms. We saw comparable DMD outcomes vs. standard of care at facilities, an AC retention benefit and retention and sustained suppression benefits amongst men. This suggests the importance of alternative service delivery models for men and of community-based strategies to decongest primary healthcare facilities. As these strategies also reduce patient inconvenience and decongest clinics, comparable outcomes are a success.

FieldValue
Modified Date
2019-09-04
Release Date
Identifier
cfbbb959-9e8e-4cd9-b5d3-155d7808cc48
License
License Not Specified
Public Access Level
Public
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Acronym: 
NAGCD 2016
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Economy Coverage: 
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Matthew P.Fox; Boston University School of Public Health, Sophie J. Pascoe; University of the Witwatersrand, Amy N. Huber; University of the Witwatersrand, Joshua Murphy; University of the Witwatersrand, Mokgadi Phokojoe; National Department of Health, Pretoria, South Africa, Marelize Gorgens; The World Bank Group, Washington DC, Sydney Rosen; Boston University School of Public Health, David Wilson; The World Bank Group, Washington DC, Yogan Pillay; National Department of Health, Pretoria, South Africa, Nicole Fraser-Hurt; The World Bank Group, Washington DC
Publisher Name: 
Development Economics Data Group; The World Bank
Version Description: 
Version 01 (June 2019)
Subtitle: 
A Cluster-Randomised Evaluation
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Sampling Procedure: 
Selection and randomisation of study sites The evaluation is being conducted at 24 PHCs in South Africa. All study sites follow the current guidelines for HIV care and treatment, dated December 2014. Six clinics were chosen from one district each in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and North West Provinces. These provinces were chosen in consultation with NDOH to represent high HIV burden regions with high-burden districts and high-volume clinics. The study team developed a list of all sites in each participating province that met these criteria and selected three matched pairs of clinics per province. Pairs were matched on ART patient volume (1000-1999, 2000-4999, or =5000 current ART patients), setting (urban, informal settlement, or rural), location (pairs should be located relatively nearby one another) and HIV viral suppression rate (see table 2 of the report). In each pair, one clinic was randomly assigned (using a computer-generated randomisation) to receive early implementation of the minimum package of interventions, while the other continued to provide standard of care. No blinding was used. Table 4 of the report provided under Related Materials shows the sample size that is required to detect meaningful differences for objectives 1-5. Sample sizes were determined using PASS software for cluster-randomised designs. Each sample size was determined to measure our short-term outcome for the objective. All calculations assume a site-clustered design with the clinic as the cluster and 24 clusters evenly split between intervention and comparison groups. We assumed power of 80% and an alpha of 0.05. Sample sizes accounted for the cluster-randomised design by assuming a coefficient of variation of 0.1. Each sample size was calculated assuming a baseline proportion of patients achieving the outcome in the absence of the intervention as determined from the literature or experience. Sample sizes were calculated based on being able to detect an absolute increase on outcomes deemed to be clinically meaningful, ranging from 15% to 20% as determined by consensus of the investigators. The total sample size was calculated to be 3456 including all of the five HIV cohorts.
Release Date: 
Tuesday, June 25, 2019
Last Updated Date: 
Tuesday, June 25, 2019
Harvest Source: 
Harvest System ID: 
10470
Citation Text: 
Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download
Modified date: 
18072
Primary Dataset: 
Yes

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