Somalia - Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011, Northeast Zone

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The North East Zone Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) is a household survey programme conducted in 2011 by the Puntland State of Somalia Ministry Planning and International Cooperation with technical and financial support from UNICEF. MICS was conducted as part of the fourth global round of MICS surveys (MICS4). It provides up-to-date information on the situation of children and women and measures key indicators that allow countries to monitor progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other internationally agreed upon commitments. The Northeast Zone Multiple Indicator Survey is a representative sample survey of 4,954 households, out of which 4,785 were successfully interviewed including 5,492 women age 15 – 49 years and 4,714 mothers and caretakers of children less than five years old. The primary purpose of MICS is to provide policy makers and planners with reliable and detailed information needed to monitor the situation of women and children. Information on nutrition, child health, water and sanitation, reproductive health, child development, literacy and education, child protection, HIV/AIDS and orphan hood and access to mass media and use of information/communication technology is included.

Acronym: 
MICS-NZ 2011
Type: 
Microdata
Topics: 
Topic not specified
Economy Coverage: 
Economy Coverage not specified
Languages Supported: 
English
Geographical Coverage: 
Somalia
Reference ID: 
SOM_2011_MICS-NZ_v01_M
Release Date: 
February 3, 2016

Harvest Source

Harvest Source: 
Microdata

Harvest Source ID

Harvest Source ID: 
8641

Last Updated

Last Updated: 
May 2, 2019
Data Collector(s) Name: 
Puntland State of Somalia Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation
Study Type: 

Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey - Round 4 [hh/mics-4]

Data Collector(s) Name: 
Puntland State of Somalia Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation
Data Editing: 
Data were entered using the CSPro software. The data were entered on 12 computers and carried out by 12 data entry operators and one data entry supervisor and one data manager. In order to ensure quality control, all questionnaires were double entered and internal consistency checks were performed. Procedures and standard programs developed under the global MICS4 programme and adapted to the Northeast Zone questionnaire were used throughout. Data entry began in Garowe at Puntland State University (PSU) two weeks into data collection in April 2011 but was stopped in June 2011 due to technical and logistical challenges – the university uses a generator which kept on break down and affecting data entry and some clerks were caught trying to shorten the time taken in entering data by skipping sections of the questionnaire. Following consultations between UNICEF country office, the Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation in the Northeast Zone, it was decided to ship all the questionnaires to Nairobi and have data re-entered by a new set of data entry clerks. This second round of data entry started in September 2011 and was completed in January 2012. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software program, Version 18, and the model syntax and tabulation plans developed by UNICEF were used for this purpose.
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Estimates of Sampling Error: 
Sampling errors are a measure of the variability between the estimates from all possible samples. The extent of variability is not known exactly, but can be estimated statistically from the survey data. The following sampling error measures are presented in this appendix for each of the selected indicators: - Standard error (se): Sampling errors are usually measured in terms of standard errors for particular indicators (means, proportions etc.). Standard error is the square root of the variance of the estimate. The Taylor linearization method is used for the estimation of standard errors. - Coefficient of variation (se/r) is the ratio of the standard error to the value of the indicator, and is a measure of the relative sampling error. - Design effect (deff) is the ratio of the actual variance of an indicator, under the sampling method used in the survey, to the variance calculated under the assumption of simple random sampling. The square root of the design effect (deft) is used to show the efficiency of the sample design in relation to the precision. A deft value of 1.0 indicates that the sample design is as efficient as a simple random sample, while a deft value above 1.0 indicates an increase in the standard error due to the use of a more complex sample design. - Confidence limits are calculated to show the interval within which the true value for the population can be reasonably assumed to fall, with a specified level of confidence. For any given statistic calculated from the survey, the value of that statistic will fall within a range of plus or minus two times the standard error (r + 2.se or r – 2.se) of the statistic in 95 percent of all possible samples of identical size and design. For the calculation of sampling errors from MICS data, SPSS Version 18 Complex Samples module has been used. The results are shown in the tables that follow. In addition to the sampling error measures described above, the tables also include weighted and unweighted counts of denominators for each indicator. Sampling errors are calculated for indicators of primary interest, for the national level, for urban and rural areas, and for the regions. One of the indicators is based on households, 8 selected indicators are based on household members, 20 are based on women, and 15 are based on children under 5. All indicators presented here are in the form of proportions.
Funding Name, Abbreviation, Role: 
United Nations Children’s Fund
Notes on Data Collection: 
Training for the fieldwork was conducted for 14 days in March 2011. Training included lectures on interviewing techniques and the contents of the questionnaires, and mock interviews between trainees to gain practice in questionnaire administration. Towards the end of the training period, trainees spent two days in practice interviewing in Garowe town in an area not selected for actual data collection. The data were collected by 10 teams; each comprised 6 interviewers, one sketch mapper, two field editors, a supervisor and a team leader. Fieldwork was conducted in three phases, in 2011, due to challenges relating to access. The first and major phase began on 2nd April – to 17th May 2011. Three areas with a total of 70 clusters could not be accessed and data collection was planned to take place later. In the second phase data was collected in the following areas; 41 clusters from South Galkayo and Hobyo (25th July – 16th August), 13 clusters in Haradhere (15th - 29th August) and 16 clusters from Allula/ Bargar/Ishkushban (15th - 21st December). Before data collection from these areas was done, refresher training for the teams was done. The teams were selected from the same team that collected data in phase one.
Other Forms of Data Appraisal: 
A series of data quality tables are available to review the quality of the data and include the following: - Age distribution of the household population - Age distribution of eligible and interviewed women - Age distribution of children under 5 in household and children under 5 questionnaires - Women’s completion rates by socio-economic characteristics of households - Completion rates for under-5 questionnaires by socio-economic characteristics of households - Completeness of reporting - Observation of bednets and places for hand washing - Observation of women's health cards - Observation of vaccination cards - Presence of mother in the household and the person interviewed for the under-5 questionnaire - Selection of children age 2–14 years for the child discipline module - School attendance by single age - Sex ratio at birth among children ever born and living - Births by calendar years - Reporting of age at death in days - Reporting of age at death in months The results of each of these data quality tables are shown in appendix D in document "Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011 - Final Report" pp.146-158.
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
United Nations Children’s Fund; Puntland State of Somalia Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation
Questionnaires: 
The questionnaires for the Generic MICS were structured questionnaires based on the MICS4 model questionnaire with some modifications and additions. Household questionnaires were administered in each household, which collected various information on household members including sex, age and relationship. The household questionnaire includes Household Listing Form, Education, Non Formal Education, Water and Sanitation, Household Characteristics, Insecticide Treated Nets, Indoor Residual Spraying, Child Labour, Child Discipline and Handwashing. In addition to a household questionnaire, questionnaires were administered in each household for women age 15-49 and children under age five. For children, the questionnaire was administered to the mother or primary caretaker of the child. The women's questionnaire includes Women's Background, Access to Mass Media and Use of Information/Communication Technology, Child Mortality with Birth History, Desire for Last Birth, Maternal and Newborn Health, Post-natal Health Checks, Illness Symptoms, Contraception, Unmet Need, Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting, Attitudes Towards Domestic Violence, Marriage/Union, and HIV/AIDS. The children's questionnaire includes Child's age, Early childhood development, Breastfeeding, Care of illness, Malaria and Immunization. The questionnaires are based on the MICS4 model questionnaire. From the MICS4 model English version, the questionnaires were translated into Somali and were pre-tested in Gabilely, Hargeisa during February 2011. Based on the results of the pre-test, modifications were made to the wording and translation of the questionnaires. In addition to the administration of questionnaires, fieldwork teams observed the place for hand washing. The following modules were removed from the three sets of questionnaires each for the given reason. In the household questionnaire; - Salt iodisation module was removed because there is more recent data from the Micronutrient Survey of 2009. In the questionnaire for women 15- 49 years; - Sexual behaviour module was not included as it was considered culturally sensitive in Somalia. Furthermore, it was not included in the 2006 MICS In the questionnaire for children under five years; - Birth registration was omitted based on observations in MICS3 that there are very few births registered in Somaliland as most women gave birth at home. - The anthropometry module was excluded as there was more recent data in the micronutrient survey of 2009. The following additions were made to the modules for specific questionnaires; In the questionnaire for children under five years - In the immunisation module treatment of diarrhoea using ORS distributed in the most recent Child Health Days i.e. December 2010 was added - In the same module the type of card in which child immunisation was recorded included additional type of cards from the 2009 and 2010 child health days. In the household questionnaire - The Non Formal Education module was added. It was considered necessary to provide information for the continued intervention and support for Non Formal Education by the government and partners.
Response Rates: 
Of the 4,954 households selected for the sample, excluding the households in the 13 clusters that were not surveyed, 4,904 were found to be occupied. Of these, 4,785 were successfully interviewed for a household response rate of 97.6 percent. In the interviewed households, 5,839 women (age 15-49 years) were identified. Of these, 5,492 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 94.1 percent within interviewed households. There were 4,827 children under age five listed in the household questionnaire. Questionnaires were completed for 4,714 of these children, which corresponds to a response rate of 97.7 percent within interviewed households. Overall response rates of 91.8 and 95.3 are calculated for the women’s and under-5’s interviews respectively.
Sampling Procedure: 
The primary objective of the sample design for the Northeast Zone Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey was to produce statistically reliable estimates of most indicators for the whole Northeast Zone, for urban and rural areas, and for the three regions (Bari, Nugal and Mudug) of the Zone. There were two main sampling strata: urban and rural areas. A multi-stage, stratified cluster sampling approach was used for the selection of the survey sample. The target sample size for the Northeast Zone MICS was calculated as 5,179 households. For the calculation of the sample size, the key indicator used was the polio immunization coverage for children aged 12 – 23 months. The sampling frame was the list of settlements obtained from the 2005/2006 UNDP settlement census and which was updated in preparation for the Somalia population estimation survey. For each settlement, this list contained an estimated number of households and the classification by urban and rural. Stratification consisted of separating urban and rural settlements within each region. Settlements were then used as primary sampling units and were selected with probability proportional to size, the size being the estimated number of households. Very large settlements were selected with certainty as selfrepresenting units (that is with probability equal to 1). In rural areas and small towns, settlements with more than 200 households were divided into segments of which one was randomly selected. All households in the selected segment were listed to create a frame for the selection of 18 households at the second stage using systematic sampling. For very large settlements, the list of villages and sections that comprised each settlement served as frame for the second stage selection (secondary sampling units). Each selected village and section was segmented if it contained more 200 households. One of the newly created segments was then randomly selected and all of the households it contained were listed. In the final stage, 18 households were selected from the household listing. In villages and sections containing 200 households or less, a complete household listing was carried out and 18 households were directly selected from the list of households. The sampling procedures are more fully described in "Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011 - Final Report" pp.123-124.
Series Information: 
The Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, Round 4 (MICS4) is the forth round of MICS surveys, previously conducted around 1995 (MICS1), 2000 (MICS2), and 2005-2007 (MICS3). MICS was originally developed to support countries measure progress towards an internationally agreed set of goals that emerged from the 1990 World Summit for Children. The fourth round of Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS4) is scheduled for 2009-2011 and survey results are expected to be available from 2010 onwards. MICS4 data allow countries to better monitor progress toward national goals and global commitments, including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as the target year 2015 approaches. Information on more than 20 of the MDG indicators is being collected through MICS4, offering one of the largest single sources of data for MDG monitoring. MICS4 continues to address emerging issues and new areas of interest, with validated, standard methodologies in collecting relevant data. It also helps countries capture rapid changes in key indicators.
Subtitle: 
Northeast Zone
Supervision: 
There is one supervisor for each of the 10 data collection teams in the field.
Unit of Analysis: 
- individuals - households
Universe: 
The survey covered all de jure household members (usual residents), all women aged between 15-49 years, all children under 5 living in the household.
Version Description: 
- v01: Edited, anonymous datasets for public distribution.
Weighting: 
The sample for the Northeast Zone was implemented according to its design. However, information on segmentation was not systematically captured at the field level for most of the clusters. As a result, information was incomplete for most clusters. Based on this finding, it was decided not to calculate the weights at cluster level. The sampling weights were calculated at strata level. The major component of the weight is the reciprocal of the sampling fraction employed in selecting the number of sample households in a particular sampling stratum. After the completion of fieldwork, response rates were calculated for each sampling stratum. These were used to adjust the sample weights calculated for each stratum. Similarly, the adjustment for non-response at the individual level (women and under-5 children) for each stratum is equal to the inverse value of: RRh = Number of interviewed households in stratum h/ Number of occupied households listed in stratum h After the completion of fieldwork, response rates were calculated for each sampling stratum. These were used to adjust the sample weights calculated for each cluster. Similarly, the adjustment for non-response at the individual level (women and under-5 children) for each stratum is equal to the inverse value of: RRh = Completed women’s (or under-5’s) questionnaires in stratum h / Eligible women (or under-5s) in stratum h The non-response adjustment factors for women’s and under-5’s questionnaires were applied to the adjusted household weights. Numbers of eligible women and under-5 children were obtained from the roster of household members in the Household Questionnaire for households where interviews were completed. The sample weights for the households were calculated by multiplying the above factors for each stratum. These weights were then standardized (or normalized), one purpose of which is to make the weighted sum of the interviewed sample units equal the total sample size at the national level. Normalization is performed by multiplying the sample weights by a constant factor equal to the unweighted number of households at the national level divided by the weighted total number of households (using the full sample weights adjusted for nonresponse).A similar standardization procedure was followed in obtaining standardized weights for the women’s and under-5’s questionnaires. Adjusted (normalized) weights varied between 0.96 and 1.08. Sample weights were appended to all data sets and analyses were performed by weighting each household, woman or under-5 with these sample weights.

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Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download. Example, United Nations Children’s Fund, Puntland State of Somalia Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation. Somalia Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, Northeast Zone (MICS) 2011, Ref. SOM_2011_MICS-NZ_v01_M. Dataset downloaded from [url] on [date].

The North East Zone Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) is a household survey programme conducted in 2011 by the Puntland State of Somalia Ministry Planning and International Cooperation with technical and financial support from UNICEF. MICS was conducted as part of the fourth global round of MICS surveys (MICS4). It provides up-to-date information on the situation of children and women and measures key indicators that allow countries to monitor progress towards the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other internationally agreed upon commitments. The Northeast Zone Multiple Indicator Survey is a representative sample survey of 4,954 households, out of which 4,785 were successfully interviewed including 5,492 women age 15 – 49 years and 4,714 mothers and caretakers of children less than five years old. The primary purpose of MICS is to provide policy makers and planners with reliable and detailed information needed to monitor the situation of women and children. Information on nutrition, child health, water and sanitation, reproductive health, child development, literacy and education, child protection, HIV/AIDS and orphan hood and access to mass media and use of information/communication technology is included.

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Modified Date
2019-05-02
Release Date
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ce2aff28-02eb-45b1-a34f-8068b39f51bd
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Reference ID: 
SOM_2011_MICS-NZ_v01_M
Acronym: 
MICS-NZ 2011
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Access Authority Name, Affiliation, Email: 
Childinfo, UNICEF, [email protected], http://www.childinfo.org/mics4_surveys.html
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Response Rates: 
Of the 4,954 households selected for the sample, excluding the households in the 13 clusters that were not surveyed, 4,904 were found to be occupied. Of these, 4,785 were successfully interviewed for a household response rate of 97.6 percent. In the interviewed households, 5,839 women (age 15-49 years) were identified. Of these, 5,492 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 94.1 percent within interviewed households. There were 4,827 children under age five listed in the household questionnaire. Questionnaires were completed for 4,714 of these children, which corresponds to a response rate of 97.7 percent within interviewed households. Overall response rates of 91.8 and 95.3 are calculated for the women’s and under-5’s interviews respectively.
Weighting: 
The sample for the Northeast Zone was implemented according to its design. However, information on segmentation was not systematically captured at the field level for most of the clusters. As a result, information was incomplete for most clusters. Based on this finding, it was decided not to calculate the weights at cluster level. The sampling weights were calculated at strata level. The major component of the weight is the reciprocal of the sampling fraction employed in selecting the number of sample households in a particular sampling stratum. After the completion of fieldwork, response rates were calculated for each sampling stratum. These were used to adjust the sample weights calculated for each stratum. Similarly, the adjustment for non-response at the individual level (women and under-5 children) for each stratum is equal to the inverse value of: RRh = Number of interviewed households in stratum h/ Number of occupied households listed in stratum h After the completion of fieldwork, response rates were calculated for each sampling stratum. These were used to adjust the sample weights calculated for each cluster. Similarly, the adjustment for non-response at the individual level (women and under-5 children) for each stratum is equal to the inverse value of: RRh = Completed women’s (or under-5’s) questionnaires in stratum h / Eligible women (or under-5s) in stratum h The non-response adjustment factors for women’s and under-5’s questionnaires were applied to the adjusted household weights. Numbers of eligible women and under-5 children were obtained from the roster of household members in the Household Questionnaire for households where interviews were completed. The sample weights for the households were calculated by multiplying the above factors for each stratum. These weights were then standardized (or normalized), one purpose of which is to make the weighted sum of the interviewed sample units equal the total sample size at the national level. Normalization is performed by multiplying the sample weights by a constant factor equal to the unweighted number of households at the national level divided by the weighted total number of households (using the full sample weights adjusted for nonresponse).A similar standardization procedure was followed in obtaining standardized weights for the women’s and under-5’s questionnaires. Adjusted (normalized) weights varied between 0.96 and 1.08. Sample weights were appended to all data sets and analyses were performed by weighting each household, woman or under-5 with these sample weights.
Estimates of Sampling Error: 
Sampling errors are a measure of the variability between the estimates from all possible samples. The extent of variability is not known exactly, but can be estimated statistically from the survey data. The following sampling error measures are presented in this appendix for each of the selected indicators: - Standard error (se): Sampling errors are usually measured in terms of standard errors for particular indicators (means, proportions etc.). Standard error is the square root of the variance of the estimate. The Taylor linearization method is used for the estimation of standard errors. - Coefficient of variation (se/r) is the ratio of the standard error to the value of the indicator, and is a measure of the relative sampling error. - Design effect (deff) is the ratio of the actual variance of an indicator, under the sampling method used in the survey, to the variance calculated under the assumption of simple random sampling. The square root of the design effect (deft) is used to show the efficiency of the sample design in relation to the precision. A deft value of 1.0 indicates that the sample design is as efficient as a simple random sample, while a deft value above 1.0 indicates an increase in the standard error due to the use of a more complex sample design. - Confidence limits are calculated to show the interval within which the true value for the population can be reasonably assumed to fall, with a specified level of confidence. For any given statistic calculated from the survey, the value of that statistic will fall within a range of plus or minus two times the standard error (r + 2.se or r – 2.se) of the statistic in 95 percent of all possible samples of identical size and design. For the calculation of sampling errors from MICS data, SPSS Version 18 Complex Samples module has been used. The results are shown in the tables that follow. In addition to the sampling error measures described above, the tables also include weighted and unweighted counts of denominators for each indicator. Sampling errors are calculated for indicators of primary interest, for the national level, for urban and rural areas, and for the regions. One of the indicators is based on households, 8 selected indicators are based on household members, 20 are based on women, and 15 are based on children under 5. All indicators presented here are in the form of proportions.
Time Periods: 
August, 2017
Notes on Data Collection: 
Training for the fieldwork was conducted for 14 days in March 2011. Training included lectures on interviewing techniques and the contents of the questionnaires, and mock interviews between trainees to gain practice in questionnaire administration. Towards the end of the training period, trainees spent two days in practice interviewing in Garowe town in an area not selected for actual data collection. The data were collected by 10 teams; each comprised 6 interviewers, one sketch mapper, two field editors, a supervisor and a team leader. Fieldwork was conducted in three phases, in 2011, due to challenges relating to access. The first and major phase began on 2nd April – to 17th May 2011. Three areas with a total of 70 clusters could not be accessed and data collection was planned to take place later. In the second phase data was collected in the following areas; 41 clusters from South Galkayo and Hobyo (25th July – 16th August), 13 clusters in Haradhere (15th - 29th August) and 16 clusters from Allula/ Bargar/Ishkushban (15th - 21st December). Before data collection from these areas was done, refresher training for the teams was done. The teams were selected from the same team that collected data in phase one.
Data Collector(s) Name: 
Puntland State of Somalia Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation
Supervision: 
There is one supervisor for each of the 10 data collection teams in the field.
Other Forms of Data Appraisal: 
A series of data quality tables are available to review the quality of the data and include the following: - Age distribution of the household population - Age distribution of eligible and interviewed women - Age distribution of children under 5 in household and children under 5 questionnaires - Women’s completion rates by socio-economic characteristics of households - Completion rates for under-5 questionnaires by socio-economic characteristics of households - Completeness of reporting - Observation of bednets and places for hand washing - Observation of women's health cards - Observation of vaccination cards - Presence of mother in the household and the person interviewed for the under-5 questionnaire - Selection of children age 2–14 years for the child discipline module - School attendance by single age - Sex ratio at birth among children ever born and living - Births by calendar years - Reporting of age at death in days - Reporting of age at death in months The results of each of these data quality tables are shown in appendix D in document "Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011 - Final Report" pp.146-158.
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
United Nations Children’s Fund; Puntland State of Somalia Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation
Version Description: 
- v01: Edited, anonymous datasets for public distribution.
Subtitle: 
Northeast Zone
Unit of Analysis: 
- individuals - households
Universe: 
The survey covered all de jure household members (usual residents), all women aged between 15-49 years, all children under 5 living in the household.
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Series Information: 
The Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, Round 4 (MICS4) is the forth round of MICS surveys, previously conducted around 1995 (MICS1), 2000 (MICS2), and 2005-2007 (MICS3). MICS was originally developed to support countries measure progress towards an internationally agreed set of goals that emerged from the 1990 World Summit for Children. The fourth round of Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS4) is scheduled for 2009-2011 and survey results are expected to be available from 2010 onwards. MICS4 data allow countries to better monitor progress toward national goals and global commitments, including the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) as the target year 2015 approaches. Information on more than 20 of the MDG indicators is being collected through MICS4, offering one of the largest single sources of data for MDG monitoring. MICS4 continues to address emerging issues and new areas of interest, with validated, standard methodologies in collecting relevant data. It also helps countries capture rapid changes in key indicators.
Sampling Procedure: 
The primary objective of the sample design for the Northeast Zone Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey was to produce statistically reliable estimates of most indicators for the whole Northeast Zone, for urban and rural areas, and for the three regions (Bari, Nugal and Mudug) of the Zone. There were two main sampling strata: urban and rural areas. A multi-stage, stratified cluster sampling approach was used for the selection of the survey sample. The target sample size for the Northeast Zone MICS was calculated as 5,179 households. For the calculation of the sample size, the key indicator used was the polio immunization coverage for children aged 12 – 23 months. The sampling frame was the list of settlements obtained from the 2005/2006 UNDP settlement census and which was updated in preparation for the Somalia population estimation survey. For each settlement, this list contained an estimated number of households and the classification by urban and rural. Stratification consisted of separating urban and rural settlements within each region. Settlements were then used as primary sampling units and were selected with probability proportional to size, the size being the estimated number of households. Very large settlements were selected with certainty as selfrepresenting units (that is with probability equal to 1). In rural areas and small towns, settlements with more than 200 households were divided into segments of which one was randomly selected. All households in the selected segment were listed to create a frame for the selection of 18 households at the second stage using systematic sampling. For very large settlements, the list of villages and sections that comprised each settlement served as frame for the second stage selection (secondary sampling units). Each selected village and section was segmented if it contained more 200 households. One of the newly created segments was then randomly selected and all of the households it contained were listed. In the final stage, 18 households were selected from the household listing. In villages and sections containing 200 households or less, a complete household listing was carried out and 18 households were directly selected from the list of households. The sampling procedures are more fully described in "Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey 2011 - Final Report" pp.123-124.
Release Date: 
Wednesday, February 3, 2016
Last Updated Date: 
Thursday, May 2, 2019
Questionnaires: 
The questionnaires for the Generic MICS were structured questionnaires based on the MICS4 model questionnaire with some modifications and additions. Household questionnaires were administered in each household, which collected various information on household members including sex, age and relationship. The household questionnaire includes Household Listing Form, Education, Non Formal Education, Water and Sanitation, Household Characteristics, Insecticide Treated Nets, Indoor Residual Spraying, Child Labour, Child Discipline and Handwashing. In addition to a household questionnaire, questionnaires were administered in each household for women age 15-49 and children under age five. For children, the questionnaire was administered to the mother or primary caretaker of the child. The women's questionnaire includes Women's Background, Access to Mass Media and Use of Information/Communication Technology, Child Mortality with Birth History, Desire for Last Birth, Maternal and Newborn Health, Post-natal Health Checks, Illness Symptoms, Contraception, Unmet Need, Female Genital Mutilation/Cutting, Attitudes Towards Domestic Violence, Marriage/Union, and HIV/AIDS. The children's questionnaire includes Child's age, Early childhood development, Breastfeeding, Care of illness, Malaria and Immunization. The questionnaires are based on the MICS4 model questionnaire. From the MICS4 model English version, the questionnaires were translated into Somali and were pre-tested in Gabilely, Hargeisa during February 2011. Based on the results of the pre-test, modifications were made to the wording and translation of the questionnaires. In addition to the administration of questionnaires, fieldwork teams observed the place for hand washing. The following modules were removed from the three sets of questionnaires each for the given reason. In the household questionnaire; - Salt iodisation module was removed because there is more recent data from the Micronutrient Survey of 2009. In the questionnaire for women 15- 49 years; - Sexual behaviour module was not included as it was considered culturally sensitive in Somalia. Furthermore, it was not included in the 2006 MICS In the questionnaire for children under five years; - Birth registration was omitted based on observations in MICS3 that there are very few births registered in Somaliland as most women gave birth at home. - The anthropometry module was excluded as there was more recent data in the micronutrient survey of 2009. The following additions were made to the modules for specific questionnaires; In the questionnaire for children under five years - In the immunisation module treatment of diarrhoea using ORS distributed in the most recent Child Health Days i.e. December 2010 was added - In the same module the type of card in which child immunisation was recorded included additional type of cards from the 2009 and 2010 child health days. In the household questionnaire - The Non Formal Education module was added. It was considered necessary to provide information for the continued intervention and support for Non Formal Education by the government and partners.
Data Editing: 
Data were entered using the CSPro software. The data were entered on 12 computers and carried out by 12 data entry operators and one data entry supervisor and one data manager. In order to ensure quality control, all questionnaires were double entered and internal consistency checks were performed. Procedures and standard programs developed under the global MICS4 programme and adapted to the Northeast Zone questionnaire were used throughout. Data entry began in Garowe at Puntland State University (PSU) two weeks into data collection in April 2011 but was stopped in June 2011 due to technical and logistical challenges – the university uses a generator which kept on break down and affecting data entry and some clerks were caught trying to shorten the time taken in entering data by skipping sections of the questionnaire. Following consultations between UNICEF country office, the Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation in the Northeast Zone, it was decided to ship all the questionnaires to Nairobi and have data re-entered by a new set of data entry clerks. This second round of data entry started in September 2011 and was completed in January 2012. Data were analysed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software program, Version 18, and the model syntax and tabulation plans developed by UNICEF were used for this purpose.
Harvest Source: 
Harvest Source ID: 
8641
Citation Text: 
Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download. Example, United Nations Children’s Fund, Puntland State of Somalia Ministry of Planning and International Cooperation. Somalia Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, Northeast Zone (MICS) 2011, Ref. SOM_2011_MICS-NZ_v01_M. Dataset downloaded from [url] on [date].
Modified date: 
18018
Study Type: 
Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey - Round 4 [hh/mics-4]
Primary Dataset: 
Yes
Mode of Data Collection: 

Face-to-face

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