Senegal - Stormwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Impact Evaluation 2014, Baseline Survey

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The Senegal Stormwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Impact Evaluation, Baseline Survey (SMCCAIE-BL) 2014 was collected for DIME’s impact evaluation on community engagement mechanisms in the preservation of public spaces and drainage infrastructures. It is carried out in the context of the World Bank-assisted Stormwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Project (PROGEP), which is implemented by the Dakar Municipal Development Agency (ADM) in Senegal. It will inform strategies through which PROGEP and similar projects can achieve their community engagement objectives, which are vital to the sustainability and return on these investments. Furthermore, it will contribute to our understanding of community directed development (CDD) interventions in urban settings. Data collected through the IE, including at baseline, will improve our understanding of populations living in PROGEP areas and inform the better targeting of project activities and other investments in these and similar settings.

Acronym: 
SMCCAIE-BL 2014
Type: 
Microdata
Topics: 
Topic not specified
Economy Coverage: 
Economy Coverage not specified
Languages Supported: 
English
Geographical Coverage: 
Senegal
Reference ID: 
SEN_2014_SMCCAIE-BL_v01_M
Release Date: 
March 23, 2016

Harvest Source

Harvest Source: 
Microdata

Harvest Source ID

Harvest Source ID: 
8719

Last Updated

Last Updated: 
May 7, 2019
Study Type: 

Other Household Survey

Deviations from Sample Design: 
A first challenge in data collection resulted from the fluid nature of urban communities in the study area. As mentioned in Section IV (OQP Intervention), quartiers and CBOs are sometimes dynamic units. At the time of the baseline survey, a small subset of pre-identified quartiers (4) and CBOs (16), identified earlier in the study design process, could not be located. Missing quartiers and CBOs were replaced. This issue did not reemerge during the follow-up, suggesting that the “missing” quartiers and CBOs were anomalies. While it is perhaps not so unusual for CBOs to disband, the disappearance of a geographic unit such as a quartier warrants further attention. It should be noted, however, that the list of quartiers was created by PROGEP’s SFs, and so the four missing quartiers are likely due to errors in that process. A second challenge related to locating households and CBOs for the follow-up (or endline) survey. The household and CBO surveys are both panel surveys, which means that the same households and CBOs were surveyed at baseline and follow-up. While identifying CBOs at follow-up was relatively straightforward – particularly for those in the treatment group – identifying households in the baseline sample was more complicated given the absence of a formal system of street names and addresses. At baseline, GPS coordinates for each household were taken in addition to other identifying information. These coordinates were to be the primary means of re-identifying households. These data, however, turned out to be of little use due to the density of the cities of Pikine and Guédiawaye and the lack of precision in GPS measurement (e.g. a precision of 100 meters can include the totality of houses in one quartier). To overcome this challenge, enumerators relied on neighbor networks and baseline “addresses” to locate the correct households. If a household could not be initially located, the enumerator followed a replacement protocol. These measures allowed us to achieve a low attrition rate: out of the 2,400 households surveyed at baseline, only 115 could not be included in the endline survey, an attrition rate of less than 5%. Table 6 of the survey report summarizes the target and achieved sample sizes for the household and CBO surveys at baseline and endline.
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Funding Name, Abbreviation, Role: 
Nordic Development Fund; UK-DFID Trust Fund
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Carol Newan - Trinity College of Dublin; Tara Mitchell - Trinity College of Dublin; Marcus Holmlund - DECIE, World Bank
Questionnaires: 
The household questionnaire collected information on (i) household demographics, (ii) livelihoods and income sources, (iii) socioeconomic characteristics, (iv) health outcomes, (v) exposure to flooding, (vi) knowledge of flood risk mitigation methods, and (vii) attitudes towards community participation and one’s general responsibilities vis-à-vis the community (and vice-versa), including a “decision activity” section designed to measure willingness to contribute to a public good. Enumerators also recorded their direct observations of the general cleanliness of the immediate area around the household. At endline, an additional set of questions were asked about the OQP to measure household awareness and perception of the intervention. As the endline was collected after the rainy season of 2016, questions related to flooding were also added for 2015 and 2016. Table 5 summarizes the sections included in the baseline and endline surveys.
Sampling Procedure: 
The PROGEP IE uses a randomized controlled trial (RCT) study design. Given a list of areas, such a study design assigns the focal intervention to some areas completely at random, while other areas remain without the intervention. With a sufficiently large number of areas over which to randomize, such a procedure ensures that, on average, those areas assigned to receive the intervention (the "treatment" group) are statistically equivalent to those areas not assigned to receive the intervention (the "control" group). In the absence of the intervention, we would expect that outcomes in the treatment and control groups would remain identical, as they are both exposed to the same influences on average. With the intervention, however, we introduce a new factor which only affects the treatment group. We can therefore confidently attribute any differences in outcomes following the treatment to the intervention alone. Additional details on sampling provided in the Impact evaluation study design section of the report provided as related material.
Subtitle: 
Baseline Survey

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Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download Example: Carol Newan and Tara Mitchell, Trinity College of Dublin, Marcus Holmlund, World Bank. Senegal Stormwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Impact Evaluation, Baseline Survey (SMCCAIE-BL) 2014. SEN_2014_SMCCAIE-BL_v01_M. Dataset downloaded from [URL] on [date].

The Senegal Stormwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Impact Evaluation, Baseline Survey (SMCCAIE-BL) 2014 was collected for DIME’s impact evaluation on community engagement mechanisms in the preservation of public spaces and drainage infrastructures. It is carried out in the context of the World Bank-assisted Stormwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Project (PROGEP), which is implemented by the Dakar Municipal Development Agency (ADM) in Senegal. It will inform strategies through which PROGEP and similar projects can achieve their community engagement objectives, which are vital to the sustainability and return on these investments. Furthermore, it will contribute to our understanding of community directed development (CDD) interventions in urban settings. Data collected through the IE, including at baseline, will improve our understanding of populations living in PROGEP areas and inform the better targeting of project activities and other investments in these and similar settings.

FieldValue
Modified Date
2019-05-09
Release Date
Identifier
45ff7dc7-76e3-414e-8531-767f7586262e
License
License Not Specified
Contact Email
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Reference ID: 
SEN_2014_SMCCAIE-BL_v01_M
Acronym: 
SMCCAIE-BL 2014
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Time Periods: 
September, 2017
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Carol Newan - Trinity College of Dublin; Tara Mitchell - Trinity College of Dublin; Marcus Holmlund - DECIE, World Bank
Terms of Use: 
Subtitle: 
Baseline Survey
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Sampling Procedure: 
The PROGEP IE uses a randomized controlled trial (RCT) study design. Given a list of areas, such a study design assigns the focal intervention to some areas completely at random, while other areas remain without the intervention. With a sufficiently large number of areas over which to randomize, such a procedure ensures that, on average, those areas assigned to receive the intervention (the "treatment" group) are statistically equivalent to those areas not assigned to receive the intervention (the "control" group). In the absence of the intervention, we would expect that outcomes in the treatment and control groups would remain identical, as they are both exposed to the same influences on average. With the intervention, however, we introduce a new factor which only affects the treatment group. We can therefore confidently attribute any differences in outcomes following the treatment to the intervention alone. Additional details on sampling provided in the Impact evaluation study design section of the report provided as related material.
Deviations from Sample Design: 
A first challenge in data collection resulted from the fluid nature of urban communities in the study area. As mentioned in Section IV (OQP Intervention), quartiers and CBOs are sometimes dynamic units. At the time of the baseline survey, a small subset of pre-identified quartiers (4) and CBOs (16), identified earlier in the study design process, could not be located. Missing quartiers and CBOs were replaced. This issue did not reemerge during the follow-up, suggesting that the “missing” quartiers and CBOs were anomalies. While it is perhaps not so unusual for CBOs to disband, the disappearance of a geographic unit such as a quartier warrants further attention. It should be noted, however, that the list of quartiers was created by PROGEP’s SFs, and so the four missing quartiers are likely due to errors in that process. A second challenge related to locating households and CBOs for the follow-up (or endline) survey. The household and CBO surveys are both panel surveys, which means that the same households and CBOs were surveyed at baseline and follow-up. While identifying CBOs at follow-up was relatively straightforward – particularly for those in the treatment group – identifying households in the baseline sample was more complicated given the absence of a formal system of street names and addresses. At baseline, GPS coordinates for each household were taken in addition to other identifying information. These coordinates were to be the primary means of re-identifying households. These data, however, turned out to be of little use due to the density of the cities of Pikine and Guédiawaye and the lack of precision in GPS measurement (e.g. a precision of 100 meters can include the totality of houses in one quartier). To overcome this challenge, enumerators relied on neighbor networks and baseline “addresses” to locate the correct households. If a household could not be initially located, the enumerator followed a replacement protocol. These measures allowed us to achieve a low attrition rate: out of the 2,400 households surveyed at baseline, only 115 could not be included in the endline survey, an attrition rate of less than 5%. Table 6 of the survey report summarizes the target and achieved sample sizes for the household and CBO surveys at baseline and endline.
Release Date: 
Wednesday, March 23, 2016
Last Updated Date: 
Tuesday, May 7, 2019
Questionnaires: 
The household questionnaire collected information on (i) household demographics, (ii) livelihoods and income sources, (iii) socioeconomic characteristics, (iv) health outcomes, (v) exposure to flooding, (vi) knowledge of flood risk mitigation methods, and (vii) attitudes towards community participation and one’s general responsibilities vis-à-vis the community (and vice-versa), including a “decision activity” section designed to measure willingness to contribute to a public good. Enumerators also recorded their direct observations of the general cleanliness of the immediate area around the household. At endline, an additional set of questions were asked about the OQP to measure household awareness and perception of the intervention. As the endline was collected after the rainy season of 2016, questions related to flooding were also added for 2015 and 2016. Table 5 summarizes the sections included in the baseline and endline surveys.
Harvest Source: 
Harvest Source ID: 
8719
Citation Text: 
Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download Example: Carol Newan and Tara Mitchell, Trinity College of Dublin, Marcus Holmlund, World Bank. Senegal Stormwater Management and Climate Change Adaptation Impact Evaluation, Baseline Survey (SMCCAIE-BL) 2014. SEN_2014_SMCCAIE-BL_v01_M. Dataset downloaded from [URL] on [date].
Modified date: 
18023
Study Type: 
Other Household Survey
Primary Dataset: 
Yes
Mode of Data Collection: 

Computer Assisted Personal Interview

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This dataset is made available under the World Bank Microdata Research License

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