Philippines - National Demographic and Health Survey 2017

The 2017 Philippines National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS 2017) is a nationwide survey with a nationally representative sample of approximately 30,832 housing units. The primary objective of the survey is to provide up-to-date estimates of basic demographic and health indicators. Specifically, the NDHS 2017 collected information on marriage, fertility levels, fertility preferences, awareness and use of family planning methods, breastfeeding, maternal and child health, child mortality, awareness and behavior regarding HIV/AIDS, women’s empowerment, domestic violence, and other health-related issues such as smoking. The information collected through the NDHS 2017 is intended to assist policymakers and program managers in the Department of Health (DOH) and other organizations in designing and evaluating programs and strategies for improving the health of the country’s population.

Acronym: 
DHS/ NDHS 2017
Type: 
Microdata
Topics: 
Topic not specified
Languages Supported: 
English
Geographical Coverage: 
Philippines
Reference ID: 
PHL_2017_DHS_v01_M
Release Date: 
October 4, 2018

Harvest Source

Harvest Source: 
Microdata

Harvest Source ID

Harvest Source ID: 
10072

Last Updated

Last Updated: 
October 4, 2018
Data Collector(s) Name: 
The Philippines Statistics Authority
Data Collector(s) Name: 
The Philippines Statistics Authority
Data Editing: 
The processing of the NDHS 2017 data began almost as soon as fieldwork started. As data collection was completed in each PSU, all electronic data files were transferred via an Internet file streaming system (IFSS) to the PSA central office in Quezon City. These data files were registered and checked for inconsistencies, incompleteness, and outliers. The field teams were alerted to any inconsistencies and errors while still in the PSU. Secondary editing involved resolving inconsistencies and the coding of openended questions; the former was carried out in the central office by a senior data processor, while the latter was taken on by regional coordinators and central office staff during a 5-day workshop following the completion of the fieldwork. Data editing was carried out using the CSPro software package. The concurrent processing of the data offered a distinct advantage, because it maximized the likelihood of the data being error-free and accurate. Timely generation of field check tables allowed for more effective monitoring. The secondary editing of the data was completed by November 2017. The final cleaning of the data set was carried out by data processing specialists from The DHS Program by the end of December 2017.
Estimates of Sampling Error: 
The estimates from a sample survey are affected by two types of errors: nonsampling errors and sampling errors. Nonsampling errors are the results of mistakes made in implementing data collection and data processing, such as failure to locate and interview the correct household, misunderstanding of the questions on the part of either the interviewer or the respondent, and data entry errors. Although numerous efforts were made during the implementation of the Philippines National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) 2017 to minimize this type of error, nonsampling errors are impossible to avoid and difficult to evaluate statistically.Sampling errors, on the other hand, can be evaluated statistically. The sample of respondents selected in the NDHS 2017 is only one of many samples that could have been selected from the same population, using the same design and expected size. Each of these samples would yield results that differ somewhat from the results of the actual sample selected. Sampling errors are a measure of the variability among all possible samples. Although the degree of variability is not known exactly, it can be estimated from the survey results.Sampling error is usually measured in terms of the standard error for a particular statistic (mean, percentage, etc.), which is the square root of the variance. The standard error can be used to calculate confidence intervals within which the true value for the population can reasonably be assumed to fall. For example, for any given statistic calculated from a sample survey, the value of that statistic will fall within a range of plus or minus two times the standard error of that statistic in 95% of all possible samples of identical size and design.If the sample of respondents had been selected as a simple random sample, it would have been possible to use straightforward formulas for calculating sampling errors. However, the NDHS 2017 sample is the result of a multi-stage stratified design, and, consequently, it was necessary to use more complex formulas. Sampling errors are computed in SAS, using programs developed by ICF. These programs use the Taylor linearization method to estimate variances for survey estimates that are means, proportions, or ratios. The Jackknife repeated replication method is used for variance estimation of more complex statistics such as fertility and mortality rates.A more detailed description of estimates of sampling errors are presented in Appendix B of the survey final report.
Funding Name, Abbreviation, Role: 
Government of Philippines; United States Agency for International Development
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Philippines Statistics Authority (PSA) - Government of Philippines
Questionnaires: 
Two questionnaires were used for the NDHS 2017: the Household Questionnaire and the Woman’s Questionnaire. Both questionnaires, based on The DHS Program’s standard Demographic and Health Survey (DHS-7) questionnaires, were adapted to reflect the population and health issues relevant to the Philippines. Input was solicited from various stakeholders representing government agencies, universities, and international agencies.
Response Rates: 
A total of 31,791 households were selected for the sample, of which 27,855 were occupied. Of the occupied households, 27,496 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 99%. In the interviewed households, 25,690 women age 15-49 were identified for individual interviews; interviews were completed with 25,074 women, yielding a response rate of 98%.The household response rate is slightly lower in urban areas than in rural areas (98% and 99%, respectively); however, there is no difference by urban-rural residence in response rates among women (98% for each).
Sampling Procedure: 
The sampling scheme provides data representative of the country as a whole, for urban and rural areas separately, and for each of the country’s administrative regions. The sample selection methodology for the NDHS 2017 is based on a two-stage stratified sample design using the Master Sample Frame (MSF), designed and compiled by the PSA. The MSF is constructed based on the results of the 2010 Census of Population and Housing and updated based on the 2015 Census of Population. The first stage involved a systematic selection of 1,250 primary sampling units (PSUs) distributed by province or HUC. A PSU can be a barangay, a portion of a large barangay, or two or more adjacent small barangays. In the second stage, an equal take of either 20 or 26 sample housing units were selected from each sampled PSU using systematic random sampling. In situations where a housing unit contained one to three households, all households were interviewed. In the rare situation where a housing unit contained more than three households, no more than three households were interviewed. The survey interviewers were instructed to interview only the pre-selected housing units. No replacements and no changes of the preselected housing units were allowed in the implementing stage in order to prevent bias. Survey weights were calculated, added to the data file, and applied so that weighted results are representative estimates of indicators at the regional and national levels. All women age 15-49 who were either permanent residents of the selected households or visitors who stayed in the households the night before the survey were eligible to be interviewed. Among women eligible for an individual interview, one woman per household was selected for a module on domestic violence. For further details on sample design, see Appendix A of the final report.
Series Information: 
The 2017 Philippines National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) is the sixth Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) conducted in the Philippines as part of The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) Program and the 11th national demographic survey conducted since 1968.
Study Type: 
Demographic and Health Survey [hh/dhs]
Unit of Analysis: 
- Household- Individual- Children age 0-5- Woman age 15-49
Universe: 
The survey covered all de jure household members (usual residents) and all women age 15-49 years resident in the sample household.
Version Notes: 
The data dictionary was generated from hierarchical data that was downloaded from the The DHS Program website (http://dhsprogram.com).
Weighting: 
The design weight was adjusted for household non-response and individual non-response to get the sampling weights for households and for women, respectively. Non-response is adjusted at the sampling stratum level. For the household sampling weight, the household design weight is multiplied by the inverse of the household response rate, by stratum. For the women’s individual sampling weight, the household sampling weight is multiplied by the inverse of the women’s individual response rate, by stratum. After adjusting for non-response, the sampling weights are normalized to get the final standard weights that appear in the data files. The normalization process is done to obtain a total number of unweighted cases equal to the total number of weighted cases at the national level, for the total number of households and women. Normalization is done by multiplying the sampling weight by the estimated sampling fraction obtained from the survey for the household weight and the individual woman’s weight. The normalized weights are relative weights which are valid for estimating means, proportions, ratios, and rates, but are not valid for estimating population totals or for pooled data.

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Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download

The 2017 Philippines National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS 2017) is a nationwide survey with a nationally representative sample of approximately 30,832 housing units. The primary objective of the survey is to provide up-to-date estimates of basic demographic and health indicators. Specifically, the NDHS 2017 collected information on marriage, fertility levels, fertility preferences, awareness and use of family planning methods, breastfeeding, maternal and child health, child mortality, awareness and behavior regarding HIV/AIDS, women’s empowerment, domestic violence, and other health-related issues such as smoking. The information collected through the NDHS 2017 is intended to assist policymakers and program managers in the Department of Health (DOH) and other organizations in designing and evaluating programs and strategies for improving the health of the country’s population.

Dataset Info

These fields are compatible with DCAT, an RDF vocabulary designed to facilitate interoperability between data catalogs published on the Web.
FieldValue
Modified Date
2018-10-05
Release Date
December 31,1969
Identifier
5f20155b-3bac-4bb4-89a7-42fc25da87d9
License
License Not Specified
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Reference ID: 
PHL_2017_DHS_v01_M
Acronym: 
DHS/ NDHS 2017
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Access Authority Name, Affiliation, Email: 
The DHS Program, archive@dhsprogram.com, http://www.DHSprogram.com
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Response Rates: 
A total of 31,791 households were selected for the sample, of which 27,855 were occupied. Of the occupied households, 27,496 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 99%. In the interviewed households, 25,690 women age 15-49 were identified for individual interviews; interviews were completed with 25,074 women, yielding a response rate of 98%.The household response rate is slightly lower in urban areas than in rural areas (98% and 99%, respectively); however, there is no difference by urban-rural residence in response rates among women (98% for each).
Weighting: 
The design weight was adjusted for household non-response and individual non-response to get the sampling weights for households and for women, respectively. Non-response is adjusted at the sampling stratum level. For the household sampling weight, the household design weight is multiplied by the inverse of the household response rate, by stratum. For the women’s individual sampling weight, the household sampling weight is multiplied by the inverse of the women’s individual response rate, by stratum. After adjusting for non-response, the sampling weights are normalized to get the final standard weights that appear in the data files. The normalization process is done to obtain a total number of unweighted cases equal to the total number of weighted cases at the national level, for the total number of households and women. Normalization is done by multiplying the sampling weight by the estimated sampling fraction obtained from the survey for the household weight and the individual woman’s weight. The normalized weights are relative weights which are valid for estimating means, proportions, ratios, and rates, but are not valid for estimating population totals or for pooled data.
Estimates of Sampling Error: 
The estimates from a sample survey are affected by two types of errors: nonsampling errors and sampling errors. Nonsampling errors are the results of mistakes made in implementing data collection and data processing, such as failure to locate and interview the correct household, misunderstanding of the questions on the part of either the interviewer or the respondent, and data entry errors. Although numerous efforts were made during the implementation of the Philippines National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) 2017 to minimize this type of error, nonsampling errors are impossible to avoid and difficult to evaluate statistically.Sampling errors, on the other hand, can be evaluated statistically. The sample of respondents selected in the NDHS 2017 is only one of many samples that could have been selected from the same population, using the same design and expected size. Each of these samples would yield results that differ somewhat from the results of the actual sample selected. Sampling errors are a measure of the variability among all possible samples. Although the degree of variability is not known exactly, it can be estimated from the survey results.Sampling error is usually measured in terms of the standard error for a particular statistic (mean, percentage, etc.), which is the square root of the variance. The standard error can be used to calculate confidence intervals within which the true value for the population can reasonably be assumed to fall. For example, for any given statistic calculated from a sample survey, the value of that statistic will fall within a range of plus or minus two times the standard error of that statistic in 95% of all possible samples of identical size and design.If the sample of respondents had been selected as a simple random sample, it would have been possible to use straightforward formulas for calculating sampling errors. However, the NDHS 2017 sample is the result of a multi-stage stratified design, and, consequently, it was necessary to use more complex formulas. Sampling errors are computed in SAS, using programs developed by ICF. These programs use the Taylor linearization method to estimate variances for survey estimates that are means, proportions, or ratios. The Jackknife repeated replication method is used for variance estimation of more complex statistics such as fertility and mortality rates.A more detailed description of estimates of sampling errors are presented in Appendix B of the survey final report.
Time Periods: 
October, 2018
Data Collector(s) Name: 
The Philippines Statistics Authority
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Philippines Statistics Authority (PSA) - Government of Philippines
Unit of Analysis: 
- Household- Individual- Children age 0-5- Woman age 15-49
Universe: 
The survey covered all de jure household members (usual residents) and all women age 15-49 years resident in the sample household.
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Series Information: 
The 2017 Philippines National Demographic and Health Survey (NDHS) is the sixth Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) conducted in the Philippines as part of The Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) Program and the 11th national demographic survey conducted since 1968.
Sampling Procedure: 
The sampling scheme provides data representative of the country as a whole, for urban and rural areas separately, and for each of the country’s administrative regions. The sample selection methodology for the NDHS 2017 is based on a two-stage stratified sample design using the Master Sample Frame (MSF), designed and compiled by the PSA. The MSF is constructed based on the results of the 2010 Census of Population and Housing and updated based on the 2015 Census of Population. The first stage involved a systematic selection of 1,250 primary sampling units (PSUs) distributed by province or HUC. A PSU can be a barangay, a portion of a large barangay, or two or more adjacent small barangays. In the second stage, an equal take of either 20 or 26 sample housing units were selected from each sampled PSU using systematic random sampling. In situations where a housing unit contained one to three households, all households were interviewed. In the rare situation where a housing unit contained more than three households, no more than three households were interviewed. The survey interviewers were instructed to interview only the pre-selected housing units. No replacements and no changes of the preselected housing units were allowed in the implementing stage in order to prevent bias. Survey weights were calculated, added to the data file, and applied so that weighted results are representative estimates of indicators at the regional and national levels. All women age 15-49 who were either permanent residents of the selected households or visitors who stayed in the households the night before the survey were eligible to be interviewed. Among women eligible for an individual interview, one woman per household was selected for a module on domestic violence. For further details on sample design, see Appendix A of the final report.
Release Date: 
Thursday, October 4, 2018
Last Updated Date: 
Thursday, October 4, 2018
Questionnaires: 
Two questionnaires were used for the NDHS 2017: the Household Questionnaire and the Woman’s Questionnaire. Both questionnaires, based on The DHS Program’s standard Demographic and Health Survey (DHS-7) questionnaires, were adapted to reflect the population and health issues relevant to the Philippines. Input was solicited from various stakeholders representing government agencies, universities, and international agencies.
Data Editing: 
The processing of the NDHS 2017 data began almost as soon as fieldwork started. As data collection was completed in each PSU, all electronic data files were transferred via an Internet file streaming system (IFSS) to the PSA central office in Quezon City. These data files were registered and checked for inconsistencies, incompleteness, and outliers. The field teams were alerted to any inconsistencies and errors while still in the PSU. Secondary editing involved resolving inconsistencies and the coding of openended questions; the former was carried out in the central office by a senior data processor, while the latter was taken on by regional coordinators and central office staff during a 5-day workshop following the completion of the fieldwork. Data editing was carried out using the CSPro software package. The concurrent processing of the data offered a distinct advantage, because it maximized the likelihood of the data being error-free and accurate. Timely generation of field check tables allowed for more effective monitoring. The secondary editing of the data was completed by November 2017. The final cleaning of the data set was carried out by data processing specialists from The DHS Program by the end of December 2017.
Harvest Source: 
Harvest Source ID: 
10072
Version Notes: 
The data dictionary was generated from hierarchical data that was downloaded from the The DHS Program website (http://dhsprogram.com).
Citation Text: 
Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download
Modified date: 
17808
Study Type: 
Demographic and Health Survey [hh/dhs]
Primary Dataset: 
Yes

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