Jordan - Population and Family Health Survey 2017-2018

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The primary objective of the 2017-18 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey (JPFHS) is to provide up-to-date estimates of basic demographic and health indicators. Specifically, the 2017-18 JPFHS: - Collected data at the national level that allowed calculation of key demographic indicators - Explored the direct and indirect factors that determine levels of and trends in fertility and childhood mortality - Measured levels of contraceptive knowledge and practice - Collected data on key aspects of family health, including immunisation coverage among children, the prevalence and treatment of diarrhoea and other diseases among children under age 5, and maternity care indicators such as antenatal visits and assistance at delivery among ever-married women - Obtained data on child feeding practices, including breastfeeding, and conducted anthropometric measurements to assess the nutritional status of children under age 5 and ever-married women age 15-49 - Conducted haemoglobin testing on children age 6-59 months and ever-married women age 15-49 to provide information on the prevalence of anaemia among these groups - Collected data on knowledge and attitudes of ever-married women and men about sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV/AIDS - Obtained data on ever-married women’s experience of emotional, physical, and sexual violence - Obtained data on household health expenditures

Type: 
Microdata
Acronym: 
DHS / JPFHS 2017-18
Languages Supported: 
English
Topics: 
Topic not specified
Geographical Coverage: 
Jordan
Economy Coverage: 
Economy Coverage not specified
Release Date: 
March 28, 2019

Last Updated

Last Updated: 
March 28, 2019

Harvest System ID

Harvest System ID: 
Microdata

Harvest Source ID

Harvest Source ID: 
10389
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Version Notes: 
The data dictionary was generated from hierarchical data that was downloaded from the The DHS Program website (http://dhsprogram.com).
Funding Name, Abbreviation, Role: 
Government of Jordan; United States Agency for International Development; United Nations Population Fund; United Nations Children’s Fund
Study Type: 
Demographic and Health Survey (Standard) - DHS VII
Series Information: 
Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) are nationally-representative household surveys that provide data for a wide range of monitoring and impact evaluation indicators in the areas of population, health, and nutrition. The 2017-18 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey (JPFHS) is the seventh survey of its kind, following those implemented in 1990, 1997, 2002, 2007, 2009, and 2012. As with the prior surveys, the main objectives of the 2017-18 JPFHS were to provide up-to-date information on fertility and childhood mortality levels; fertility preferences; awareness, approval, and use of family planning methods; maternal and child health; and knowledge and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Additionally, for the first time in Jordan, the 2017-18 JPFHS included a male survey. The survey collected information on men’s basic demographic and social characteristics, on their knowledge and use of family planning methods, and on their knowledge and attitudes towards HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. The survey involved a nationally representative sample consisting of 19,400 residential households. The survey sample was designed to produce representative results for the country as a whole, for urban and rural areas separately, for the three regions, for each of the 12 governorates of the country, and for three nationality domains: the Jordanian population, the Syrian population, and the population of other nationalities.
Unit of Analysis: 
- Household - Individual - Children age 0-5 - Woman age 15-49 - Man age 15-59
Universe: 
The survey covered all de jure household members (usual residents), children age 0-5 years, women age 15-49 years and men age 15-59 years resident in the household.
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Department of Statistics (DoS) - Government of Jordan
Sampling Procedure: 
The sampling frame used for the 2017-18 JPFHS is based on Jordan's Population and Housing Census (JPHC) frame for 2015. The current survey is designed to produce results representative of the country as a whole, of urban and rural areas separately, of three regions, of 12 administrative governorates, and of three national groups: Jordanians, Syrians, and a group combined from various other nationalities. The sample for the 2017-18 JPFHS is a stratified sample selected in two stages from the 2015 census frame. Stratification was achieved by separating each governorate into urban and rural areas. Each of the Syrian camps in the governorates of Zarqa and Mafraq formed its own sampling stratum. In total, 26 sampling strata were constructed. Samples were selected independently in each sampling stratum, through a two-stage selection process, according to the sample allocation. Before the sample selection, the sampling frame was sorted by district and sub-district within each sampling stratum. By using a probability-proportional-to-size selection for the first stage of selection, an implicit stratification and proportional allocation were achieved at each of the lower administrative levels. In the first stage, 970 clusters were selected with probability proportional to cluster size, with the cluster size being the number of residential households enumerated in the 2015 JPHC. The sample allocation took into account the precision consideration at the governorate level and at the level of each of the three special domains. After selection of PSUs and clusters, a household listing operation was carried out in all selected clusters. The resulting household lists served as the sampling frame for selecting households in the second stage. A fixed number of 20 households per cluster were selected with an equal probability systematic selection from the newly created household listing. For further details on sample design, see Appendix A of the final report.
Response Rates: 
A total of 19,384 households were selected for the sample, of which 19,136 were found to be occupied at the time of the fieldwork. Of the occupied households, 18,802 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 98%. In the interviewed households, 14,870 women were identified as eligible for an individual interview; interviews were completed with 14,689 women, yielding a response rate of 99%. A total of 6,640 eligible men were identified in the sampled households and 6,429 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 97%. Response rates for both women and men were similar across urban and rural areas.
Weighting: 
A spreadsheet containing all of the sampling parameters and selection probabilities was prepared to facilitate the calculation of sampling weights. Sampling weights were adjusted for household nonresponse as well as individual nonresponse. Therefore, two sets of weights were calculated for the women’s survey: one for households and one for the women’s individual survey. There were also two sets of weights for the male survey, one for the households selected for the male survey and one for the male individual survey. Two special sets of weights were also calculated, one for the domestic violence module and one for the child discipline module, for which only one eligible individual was selected per household. The final weights were normalised in order to provide total numbers of unweighted cases equal to total numbers of weighted cases at the national level for both household weights and individual weights. It is important to note that the normalised weights are relative weights, which are valid for estimating means, proportions, and ratios but are not valid for estimating population totals and/or pooled data. Also, the number of weighted cases obtained by using the normalised weights has no direct relation with the precision of the estimates for any domain. Especially in oversampled areas, the number of weighted cases will be much smaller than the number of unweighted cases; however, it is the latter numbers that are directly related to survey precision. For further details on sampling weights, see Appendix A.4 of the final report.
Questionnaires: 
Four questionnaires were used for the 2017-18 JPFHS: the Household Questionnaire, the Woman’s Questionnaire, the Man’s Questionnaire, and the Biomarker Questionnaire. These questionnaires, based on The DHS Program’s standard Demographic and Health Survey questionnaires, were adapted to reflect population and health issues relevant to Jordan. After all questionnaires were finalised in English, they were translated into Arabic.
Estimates of Sampling Error: 
The estimates from a sample survey are affected by two types of errors: nonsampling errors and sampling errors. Nonsampling errors are the results of mistakes made in implementing data collection and data processing, such as failure to locate and interview the correct household, misunderstanding of the questions on the part of either the interviewer or the respondent, and data entry errors. Although numerous efforts were made during the implementation of the 2017-18 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey (JPFHS) to minimise this type of error, nonsampling errors are impossible to avoid and difficult to evaluate statistically. Sampling errors, on the other hand, can be evaluated statistically. The sample of respondents selected in the 2017-18 JPFHS is only one of many samples that could have been selected from the same population, using the same design and sample size. Each of these samples would yield results that differ somewhat from the results of the actual sample selected. Sampling errors are a measure of the variability among all possible samples. Although the degree of variability is not known exactly, it can be estimated from the survey results. Sampling error is usually measured in terms of the standard error for a particular statistic (mean, percentage, etc.), which is the square root of the variance. The standard error can be used to calculate confidence intervals within which the true value for the population can reasonably be assumed to fall. For example, for any given statistic calculated from a sample survey, the value of that statistic will fall within a range of plus or minus two times the standard error of that statistic in 95% of all possible samples of identical size and design. If the sample of respondents had been selected by simple random sampling, it would have been possible to use straightforward formulas for calculating sampling errors. However, the 2017-18 JPFHS sample was the result of a multi-stage stratified design, and, consequently, it was necessary to use more complex formulas. Sampling errors are computed using SAS programmes developed by ICF International. These programmes use the Taylor linearisation method to estimate variances for survey estimates that are means, proportions, or ratios. The Jackknife repeated replication method is used for variance estimation of more complex statistics such as fertility and mortality rates. The Taylor linearisation method treats any percentage or average as a ratio estimate, r = y/x, where y represents the total sample value for variable y, and x represents the total number of cases in the group or subgroup under consideration. A more detailed description of estimates of sampling errors are presented in Appendix B of the survey final report.
Access Authority Name, Affiliation, Email: 

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Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download

The primary objective of the 2017-18 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey (JPFHS) is to provide up-to-date estimates of basic demographic and health indicators. Specifically, the 2017-18 JPFHS: - Collected data at the national level that allowed calculation of key demographic indicators - Explored the direct and indirect factors that determine levels of and trends in fertility and childhood mortality - Measured levels of contraceptive knowledge and practice - Collected data on key aspects of family health, including immunisation coverage among children, the prevalence and treatment of diarrhoea and other diseases among children under age 5, and maternity care indicators such as antenatal visits and assistance at delivery among ever-married women - Obtained data on child feeding practices, including breastfeeding, and conducted anthropometric measurements to assess the nutritional status of children under age 5 and ever-married women age 15-49 - Conducted haemoglobin testing on children age 6-59 months and ever-married women age 15-49 to provide information on the prevalence of anaemia among these groups - Collected data on knowledge and attitudes of ever-married women and men about sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIV/AIDS - Obtained data on ever-married women’s experience of emotional, physical, and sexual violence - Obtained data on household health expenditures

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Modified Date
2020-04-15
Release Date
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c6c17260-b130-4bf2-aed7-61497d8ba6ad
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Public
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Acronym: 
DHS / JPFHS 2017-18
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Access Authority Name, Affiliation, Email: 
The DHS Program, [email protected], http://www.DHSprogram.com
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Response Rates: 
A total of 19,384 households were selected for the sample, of which 19,136 were found to be occupied at the time of the fieldwork. Of the occupied households, 18,802 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 98%. In the interviewed households, 14,870 women were identified as eligible for an individual interview; interviews were completed with 14,689 women, yielding a response rate of 99%. A total of 6,640 eligible men were identified in the sampled households and 6,429 were successfully interviewed, yielding a response rate of 97%. Response rates for both women and men were similar across urban and rural areas.
Weighting: 
A spreadsheet containing all of the sampling parameters and selection probabilities was prepared to facilitate the calculation of sampling weights. Sampling weights were adjusted for household nonresponse as well as individual nonresponse. Therefore, two sets of weights were calculated for the women’s survey: one for households and one for the women’s individual survey. There were also two sets of weights for the male survey, one for the households selected for the male survey and one for the male individual survey. Two special sets of weights were also calculated, one for the domestic violence module and one for the child discipline module, for which only one eligible individual was selected per household. The final weights were normalised in order to provide total numbers of unweighted cases equal to total numbers of weighted cases at the national level for both household weights and individual weights. It is important to note that the normalised weights are relative weights, which are valid for estimating means, proportions, and ratios but are not valid for estimating population totals and/or pooled data. Also, the number of weighted cases obtained by using the normalised weights has no direct relation with the precision of the estimates for any domain. Especially in oversampled areas, the number of weighted cases will be much smaller than the number of unweighted cases; however, it is the latter numbers that are directly related to survey precision. For further details on sampling weights, see Appendix A.4 of the final report.
Estimates of Sampling Error: 
The estimates from a sample survey are affected by two types of errors: nonsampling errors and sampling errors. Nonsampling errors are the results of mistakes made in implementing data collection and data processing, such as failure to locate and interview the correct household, misunderstanding of the questions on the part of either the interviewer or the respondent, and data entry errors. Although numerous efforts were made during the implementation of the 2017-18 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey (JPFHS) to minimise this type of error, nonsampling errors are impossible to avoid and difficult to evaluate statistically. Sampling errors, on the other hand, can be evaluated statistically. The sample of respondents selected in the 2017-18 JPFHS is only one of many samples that could have been selected from the same population, using the same design and sample size. Each of these samples would yield results that differ somewhat from the results of the actual sample selected. Sampling errors are a measure of the variability among all possible samples. Although the degree of variability is not known exactly, it can be estimated from the survey results. Sampling error is usually measured in terms of the standard error for a particular statistic (mean, percentage, etc.), which is the square root of the variance. The standard error can be used to calculate confidence intervals within which the true value for the population can reasonably be assumed to fall. For example, for any given statistic calculated from a sample survey, the value of that statistic will fall within a range of plus or minus two times the standard error of that statistic in 95% of all possible samples of identical size and design. If the sample of respondents had been selected by simple random sampling, it would have been possible to use straightforward formulas for calculating sampling errors. However, the 2017-18 JPFHS sample was the result of a multi-stage stratified design, and, consequently, it was necessary to use more complex formulas. Sampling errors are computed using SAS programmes developed by ICF International. These programmes use the Taylor linearisation method to estimate variances for survey estimates that are means, proportions, or ratios. The Jackknife repeated replication method is used for variance estimation of more complex statistics such as fertility and mortality rates. The Taylor linearisation method treats any percentage or average as a ratio estimate, r = y/x, where y represents the total sample value for variable y, and x represents the total number of cases in the group or subgroup under consideration. A more detailed description of estimates of sampling errors are presented in Appendix B of the survey final report.
Economy Coverage: 
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Department of Statistics (DoS) - Government of Jordan
Unit of Analysis: 
- Household - Individual - Children age 0-5 - Woman age 15-49 - Man age 15-59
Universe: 
The survey covered all de jure household members (usual residents), children age 0-5 years, women age 15-49 years and men age 15-59 years resident in the household.
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Series Information: 
Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) are nationally-representative household surveys that provide data for a wide range of monitoring and impact evaluation indicators in the areas of population, health, and nutrition. The 2017-18 Jordan Population and Family Health Survey (JPFHS) is the seventh survey of its kind, following those implemented in 1990, 1997, 2002, 2007, 2009, and 2012. As with the prior surveys, the main objectives of the 2017-18 JPFHS were to provide up-to-date information on fertility and childhood mortality levels; fertility preferences; awareness, approval, and use of family planning methods; maternal and child health; and knowledge and attitudes toward HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Additionally, for the first time in Jordan, the 2017-18 JPFHS included a male survey. The survey collected information on men’s basic demographic and social characteristics, on their knowledge and use of family planning methods, and on their knowledge and attitudes towards HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. The survey involved a nationally representative sample consisting of 19,400 residential households. The survey sample was designed to produce representative results for the country as a whole, for urban and rural areas separately, for the three regions, for each of the 12 governorates of the country, and for three nationality domains: the Jordanian population, the Syrian population, and the population of other nationalities.
Sampling Procedure: 
The sampling frame used for the 2017-18 JPFHS is based on Jordan's Population and Housing Census (JPHC) frame for 2015. The current survey is designed to produce results representative of the country as a whole, of urban and rural areas separately, of three regions, of 12 administrative governorates, and of three national groups: Jordanians, Syrians, and a group combined from various other nationalities. The sample for the 2017-18 JPFHS is a stratified sample selected in two stages from the 2015 census frame. Stratification was achieved by separating each governorate into urban and rural areas. Each of the Syrian camps in the governorates of Zarqa and Mafraq formed its own sampling stratum. In total, 26 sampling strata were constructed. Samples were selected independently in each sampling stratum, through a two-stage selection process, according to the sample allocation. Before the sample selection, the sampling frame was sorted by district and sub-district within each sampling stratum. By using a probability-proportional-to-size selection for the first stage of selection, an implicit stratification and proportional allocation were achieved at each of the lower administrative levels. In the first stage, 970 clusters were selected with probability proportional to cluster size, with the cluster size being the number of residential households enumerated in the 2015 JPHC. The sample allocation took into account the precision consideration at the governorate level and at the level of each of the three special domains. After selection of PSUs and clusters, a household listing operation was carried out in all selected clusters. The resulting household lists served as the sampling frame for selecting households in the second stage. A fixed number of 20 households per cluster were selected with an equal probability systematic selection from the newly created household listing. For further details on sample design, see Appendix A of the final report.
Release Date: 
Thursday, March 28, 2019
Last Updated Date: 
Thursday, March 28, 2019
Questionnaires: 
Four questionnaires were used for the 2017-18 JPFHS: the Household Questionnaire, the Woman’s Questionnaire, the Man’s Questionnaire, and the Biomarker Questionnaire. These questionnaires, based on The DHS Program’s standard Demographic and Health Survey questionnaires, were adapted to reflect population and health issues relevant to Jordan. After all questionnaires were finalised in English, they were translated into Arabic.
Harvest Source: 
Harvest System ID: 
10389
Version Notes: 
The data dictionary was generated from hierarchical data that was downloaded from the The DHS Program website (http://dhsprogram.com).
Citation Text: 
Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download
Modified date: 
17983
Study Type: 
Demographic and Health Survey (Standard) - DHS VII
Primary Dataset: 
Yes
Funding Name, Abbreviation, Role: 

Government of Jordan; United States Agency for International Development; United Nations Population Fund; United Nations Children’s Fund

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