Jamaica - Survey of Living Conditions 2000

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The Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (JSLC) was implemented to establish baseline measures of household welfare and then to monitor the impact of Jamaica's Human Resources Development Program on health, education and nutrition. The JSLC differs from other LSMS surveys in its relatively narrow focus and greater emphasis on immediate policy impact.The JSLC is linked to the ongoing quarterly Labor Force Survey (LFS). The households are visited once for the standard LFS. Then a subset of households are revisited about a month later for the SLC.

Type: 
Microdata
Acronym: 
SLC 2000
Languages Supported: 
English
Topics: 
Topic not specified
Tags: 
Geographical Coverage: 
Jamaica
Economy Coverage: 
Economy Coverage not specified
Release Date: 
September 29, 2011

Last Updated

Last Updated: 
January 30, 2020

Harvest System ID

Harvest System ID: 
Microdata

Harvest Source ID

Harvest Source ID: 
329
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Version Description: 
Version 0.2 (June 2015). Version 0.1 (June 2010).
Publisher Name: 

Development Economics Data Group; The World Bank

Study Type: 
Living Standards Measurement Study [hh/lsms]
Series Information: 
As of 2002, Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) household surveys have been conducted in over 30 countries. The purpose of these surveys is to provide household level data for evaluating the effect of a variety of government policies on the living conditions of the population.The Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (JSLC) was first conducted in 1988. The JSLC was originally conceived to be a semi-annual survey. Early on the schedule was interrupted by Hurricane Gilbert and national elections. In 1990, an annual survey was deemed to be sufficient and an annual schedule was adopted. Fourteen rounds of the survey were completed from August 1988 to July 2000: 1988, 1989-1, 1989-2, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000.
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Statistical Institute of Jamaica, Planning Institute of Jamaica
Sampling Procedure: 
The sample design used for the JSLC was derived from the Labor Force Survey. The LFS sampling strategy is a two stage stratified process designed to select approximately one and a half percent of the dwellings in Jamaica. In the first stage, enumeration districts are selected from a geographic frame. In the second, households are selected from the frame of dwellings in the enumeration district. The sample is self-weighted, that is each household in Jamaica is equally likely to be included in the survey sample. From 1988 through 2000, there have been four versions of the LFS sample design which have been used as the basis of the JSLC sample.
Questionnaires: 
Unlike many LSMS surveys, the JSLC does not include price and community questionnaires. Because Jamaica is small and has a good transport network, regional price variation was expected to be small and, for this reason, price data were not collected. Much of the distance to, and availability of, services and infrastructure that is usually gathered in the LSMS community questionnaire is collected in the JSLC’s household, health services and school questionnaires described below. Core Questionnaire : For each round of the JSLC, the household questionnaire has included modules covering health, education, anthropometric measurements for all children less than five years old, daily expenses, consumption expenditures, non-consumption expenditures, food expenses, consumption of home production, housing, an inventory of durable goods, other household income, and food stamps. Employment and job search information for all adults age 14 or older is available from the Labor Force Survey. The JSLC household questionnaire was completed in one interview approximately one month after the Labor Force Survey. The JSLC questionnaire has undergone substantial revision since 1988, reflecting accumulated experience and changing demands for data. For example, the food stamps and other income modules were added after the 1988 survey, in which these subjects were addressed only briefly in the housing module.
Supervision: 
Four senior supervisors are located in Kingston, High Gate, Linstead and Black River (in the south, north, center and west of the country, respectively). Their responsibilities are largely administrative. The supervisor is responsible for: 1) the review of each completed questionnaire for inconsistencies; 2) observation of some interviews; 3) field checks of some completed questionnaires; 4) verification of dwellings recorded as vacant or closed; 5) visiting nonresponding households to encourage cooperation; and 6) taking the anthropometric measurements.
Data Editing: 
Data entry is done in The Surveys and Computer Systems Divisions in the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN) by its own data entry operators. The cleaning process (after the questionnaires have left the field) has been standardized since 1989-2. Before data entry, the questionnaires are edited and coded, where necessary, by the Editors-Coders at STATIN. The number of questions that require coding in the office is intentionally kept very low. Clerical errors are removed, where possible, and checks are made for consistency using the data entry program. The area classification is then checked using a computer program.
Other Processing: 
- Health - Education - Housing - Anthropometrics - Daily Expenses - Non-Consumption Expenditures - Consumption Expenditures - Food Expenses - Inventory of Durable Goods - Miscellaneous Income - Food Stamps - Housing and related expenses
Access Authority Name, Affiliation, Email: 

Social and Manpower Planning and Research Division, Planning Institute of Jamaica

Time Periods: 
August, 2017

No Visualizations Available.

Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download Example: Statistical Institute of Jamaica, Planning Institute of Jamaica, and The World Bank. Survey of Living Conditions (SLC) 2000. Ref. JAM_2000_SLC_v01_M. Dataset downloaded from http://microdata.worldbank.org on [date].

The Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (JSLC) was implemented to establish baseline measures of household welfare and then to monitor the impact of Jamaica's Human Resources Development Program on health, education and nutrition. The JSLC differs from other LSMS surveys in its relatively narrow focus and greater emphasis on immediate policy impact.The JSLC is linked to the ongoing quarterly Labor Force Survey (LFS). The households are visited once for the standard LFS. Then a subset of households are revisited about a month later for the SLC.

FieldValue
Modified Date
2020-02-12
Release Date
Identifier
14ee3776-4020-40a3-b88b-0893b8a9fa88
License
License Not Specified
Contact Email
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Acronym: 
SLC 2000
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Access Authority Name, Affiliation, Email: 
Social and Manpower Planning and Research Division, Planning Institute of Jamaica
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Time Periods: 
August, 2017
Supervision: 
Four senior supervisors are located in Kingston, High Gate, Linstead and Black River (in the south, north, center and west of the country, respectively). Their responsibilities are largely administrative. The supervisor is responsible for: 1) the review of each completed questionnaire for inconsistencies; 2) observation of some interviews; 3) field checks of some completed questionnaires; 4) verification of dwellings recorded as vacant or closed; 5) visiting nonresponding households to encourage cooperation; and 6) taking the anthropometric measurements.
Economy Coverage: 
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Statistical Institute of Jamaica, Planning Institute of Jamaica
Publisher Name: 
Development Economics Data Group; The World Bank
Version Description: 
Version 0.2 (June 2015). Version 0.1 (June 2010).
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Series Information: 
As of 2002, Living Standards Measurement Study (LSMS) household surveys have been conducted in over 30 countries. The purpose of these surveys is to provide household level data for evaluating the effect of a variety of government policies on the living conditions of the population.The Jamaica Survey of Living Conditions (JSLC) was first conducted in 1988. The JSLC was originally conceived to be a semi-annual survey. Early on the schedule was interrupted by Hurricane Gilbert and national elections. In 1990, an annual survey was deemed to be sufficient and an annual schedule was adopted. Fourteen rounds of the survey were completed from August 1988 to July 2000: 1988, 1989-1, 1989-2, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000.
Sampling Procedure: 
The sample design used for the JSLC was derived from the Labor Force Survey. The LFS sampling strategy is a two stage stratified process designed to select approximately one and a half percent of the dwellings in Jamaica. In the first stage, enumeration districts are selected from a geographic frame. In the second, households are selected from the frame of dwellings in the enumeration district. The sample is self-weighted, that is each household in Jamaica is equally likely to be included in the survey sample. From 1988 through 2000, there have been four versions of the LFS sample design which have been used as the basis of the JSLC sample.
Release Date: 
Thursday, September 29, 2011
Last Updated Date: 
Thursday, January 30, 2020
Questionnaires: 
Unlike many LSMS surveys, the JSLC does not include price and community questionnaires. Because Jamaica is small and has a good transport network, regional price variation was expected to be small and, for this reason, price data were not collected. Much of the distance to, and availability of, services and infrastructure that is usually gathered in the LSMS community questionnaire is collected in the JSLC’s household, health services and school questionnaires described below. Core Questionnaire : For each round of the JSLC, the household questionnaire has included modules covering health, education, anthropometric measurements for all children less than five years old, daily expenses, consumption expenditures, non-consumption expenditures, food expenses, consumption of home production, housing, an inventory of durable goods, other household income, and food stamps. Employment and job search information for all adults age 14 or older is available from the Labor Force Survey. The JSLC household questionnaire was completed in one interview approximately one month after the Labor Force Survey. The JSLC questionnaire has undergone substantial revision since 1988, reflecting accumulated experience and changing demands for data. For example, the food stamps and other income modules were added after the 1988 survey, in which these subjects were addressed only briefly in the housing module.
Data Editing: 
Data entry is done in The Surveys and Computer Systems Divisions in the Statistical Institute of Jamaica (STATIN) by its own data entry operators. The cleaning process (after the questionnaires have left the field) has been standardized since 1989-2. Before data entry, the questionnaires are edited and coded, where necessary, by the Editors-Coders at STATIN. The number of questions that require coding in the office is intentionally kept very low. Clerical errors are removed, where possible, and checks are made for consistency using the data entry program. The area classification is then checked using a computer program.
Other Processing: 
- Health - Education - Housing - Anthropometrics - Daily Expenses - Non-Consumption Expenditures - Consumption Expenditures - Food Expenses - Inventory of Durable Goods - Miscellaneous Income - Food Stamps - Housing and related expenses
Harvest Source: 
Harvest System ID: 
329
Citation Text: 
Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download Example: Statistical Institute of Jamaica, Planning Institute of Jamaica, and The World Bank. Survey of Living Conditions (SLC) 2000. Ref. JAM_2000_SLC_v01_M. Dataset downloaded from http://microdata.worldbank.org on [date].
Modified date: 
18291
Study Type: 
Living Standards Measurement Study [hh/lsms]
Primary Dataset: 
Yes
Mode of Data Collection: 

Face-to-face

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