Global Education Policy Dashboard

Primary tabs

Policymakers in low- and middle-income countries who are working to improve student learning often find themselves flying blind. They see the budget that goes into education and (sometimes) the learning that students come out with, but they lack information on the crucial factors in between—the practices, policies, and politics—that drive those learning outcomes. The Global Education Policy Dashboard (GEPD) shines a light on those hidden drivers.

Many countries, despite having significantly increased access to education for their children and youth, now realize that they are facing a learning crisis (World Development Report 2018). In low- and middle-income countries, despite near universal enrollment in primary school, 53 percent of children cannot read and understand a simple story by late primary age (World Bank 2019). This statistic underlines the reality that schooling is not the same as learning—even though education policy often assumes that it is (Pritchett 2013). It shows just how far off track the world is from the aspiration embodied in Sustainable Development Goal 4, of providing at least quality secondary education to all children.

The World Development Report 2018 argued that the learning crisis has multiple causes: poor service delivery in schools and communities, unhealthy politics and low bureaucratic capacity, and policies that are not aligned toward learning for all. To tackle the crisis and improve learning for all children, countries need to know where they stand on these three key dimensions: practices (or service delivery), policies, and politics. But providing such a systemwide overview requires better measurement. Many of these drivers of learning are not captured by existing administrative systems. And although new measurement tools capture some of those aspects well, no single instrument pulls together data on all these areas. This gap leaves policymakers in the dark about what is working and what isn’t.

To fill this gap, the World Bank, with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the UK’s Department for International Development, and the Government of Japan, has launched a Global Education Policy Dashboard, which measures the drivers of learning outcomes in basic education around the world. In doing so, it highlights gaps between current practice and what the evidence suggests would be most effective in promoting learning, and it gives governments a way to set priorities and track progress as they work to close those gaps.

Type: 
Time Series
Acronym: 
GEPD
Languages Supported: 
English
External Contact Email: 
Topics: 
Education
GP & CCSAs: 
Education
WB Project ID: 
P169940
Granularity: 
Geographical Coverage: 
Peru
Jordan
Economy Coverage: 
IBRD
IDA
Number of Economies: 
2
Periodicity: 
Annual
Temporal Coverage: 
2019 - 2021

Update Frequency

Update Frequency: 
Annually +
Source: 

The dashboard project collects new data in each country using three new instruments: a School Survey, a Policy Survey, and a Survey of Public Officials. Data collection involves school visits, classroom observations, legislative reviews, teacher and student assessments, and interviews with teachers, principals, and public officials. In addition, the project draws on some existing data sources to complement the new data it collects. A major objective of the GEPD project was to develop focused, cost-effective instruments and data-collection procedures, so that the dashboard can be...

Statistical Concept and Methodology: 
Populating the dashboard requires, aside from the expert-filled Policy Survey, collecting nationally representative data from two field surveys, as noted above—the school and public official surveys. The sample sizes are as follows: - Sample of Schools – The sample size for the School Survey normally consists of 200 to 300 schools, a number that allows for the reporting of nationally representative estimates with a high level of precision for all the GEPD indicators. Within this sample of schools, the team interviews 200-300 school principals and 1,000-1,500 teachers, while also conducting assessments of 600-900 1st-graders and (depending on classroom size) 4,000-6,000 4th-graders. - Sample of Public Officials – The sample size for the Survey of Public Officials is 200. These public officials work in the Ministry of Education at either the central, regional, or district level. In the typical country, the breakdown of the sample is 60 officials at the central level, 70 at the regional level, and 70 at the district level. Other than the director(s) and the person in charge of human resources of each office, who are always interviewed, all public officials are randomly selected.
Aggregation Method: 
Data are aggregated to the national level by weighting survey responses based on the sampling design. Breakdowns by Urban/Rural and Male/Female are available as well in some cases, and are formed by producing a weighted average of the responses within these groups.
Time Periods: 
April, 2021

No Visualizations Available.

Policymakers in low- and middle-income countries who are working to improve student learning often find themselves flying blind. They see the budget that goes into education and (sometimes) the learning that students come out with, but they lack information on the crucial factors in between—the practices, policies, and politics—that drive those learning outcomes. The Global Education Policy Dashboard (GEPD) shines a light on those hidden drivers.

Many countries, despite having significantly increased access to education for their children and youth, now realize that they are facing a learning crisis (World Development Report 2018). In low- and middle-income countries, despite near universal enrollment in primary school, 53 percent of children cannot read and understand a simple story by late primary age (World Bank 2019). This statistic underlines the reality that schooling is not the same as learning—even though education policy often assumes that it is (Pritchett 2013). It shows just how far off track the world is from the aspiration embodied in Sustainable Development Goal 4, of providing at least quality secondary education to all children.

The World Development Report 2018 argued that the learning crisis has multiple causes: poor service delivery in schools and communities, unhealthy politics and low bureaucratic capacity, and policies that are not aligned toward learning for all. To tackle the crisis and improve learning for all children, countries need to know where they stand on these three key dimensions: practices (or service delivery), policies, and politics. But providing such a systemwide overview requires better measurement. Many of these drivers of learning are not captured by existing administrative systems. And although new measurement tools capture some of those aspects well, no single instrument pulls together data on all these areas. This gap leaves policymakers in the dark about what is working and what isn’t.

To fill this gap, the World Bank, with support from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the UK’s Department for International Development, and the Government of Japan, has launched a Global Education Policy Dashboard, which measures the drivers of learning outcomes in basic education around the world. In doing so, it highlights gaps between current practice and what the evidence suggests would be most effective in promoting learning, and it gives governments a way to set priorities and track progress as they work to close those gaps.

Data Resources

FieldValue
Modified Date
2021-05-05
Release Date
Periodicity
Annual
Identifier
26114d6b-2759-4ae5-8bfd-6e70917fb35b
Temporal Coverage

2019 - 2021

License
License Not Specified
Contact Email
Public Access Level
Public
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Acronym: 
GEPD
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Time Periods: 
April, 2021
Economy Coverage: 
GP & CCSAs: 
Number of Economies: 
2
Update Frequency: 
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
WB Project ID: 
P169940
Start Date: 
Friday, March 1, 2019
End Date: 
Thursday, April 1, 2021
HED
External Contact Email: 
Granularity: 
Statistical Concept and Methodology: 
Populating the dashboard requires, aside from the expert-filled Policy Survey, collecting nationally representative data from two field surveys, as noted above—the school and public official surveys. The sample sizes are as follows: - Sample of Schools – The sample size for the School Survey normally consists of 200 to 300 schools, a number that allows for the reporting of nationally representative estimates with a high level of precision for all the GEPD indicators. Within this sample of schools, the team interviews 200-300 school principals and 1,000-1,500 teachers, while also conducting assessments of 600-900 1st-graders and (depending on classroom size) 4,000-6,000 4th-graders. - Sample of Public Officials – The sample size for the Survey of Public Officials is 200. These public officials work in the Ministry of Education at either the central, regional, or district level. In the typical country, the breakdown of the sample is 60 officials at the central level, 70 at the regional level, and 70 at the district level. Other than the director(s) and the person in charge of human resources of each office, who are always interviewed, all public officials are randomly selected.
Aggregation Method: 
Data are aggregated to the national level by weighting survey responses based on the sampling design. Breakdowns by Urban/Rural and Male/Female are available as well in some cases, and are formed by producing a weighted average of the responses within these groups.
Modified date: 
99
Primary Dataset: 
Yes
Source: 

The dashboard project collects new data in each country using three new instruments: a School Survey, a Policy Survey, and a Survey of Public Officials. Data collection involves school visits, classroom observations, legislative reviews, teacher and student assessments, and interviews with teachers, principals, and public officials. In addition, the project draws on some existing data sources to complement the new data it collects. A major objective of the GEPD project was to develop focused, cost-effective instruments and data-collection procedures, so that the dashboard can be inexpensive enough to be applied (and re-applied) in many countries. The team achieved this by streamlining and simplifying existing instruments, and thereby reducing the time required for data collection and training of enumerators.

More information pertaining to each of the three instruments can be found below:
• School Survey: The School Survey collects data primarily on practices (the quality of service delivery in schools), but also on some de facto policy indicators. It consists of streamlined versions of existing instruments—including Service Delivery Surveys on teachers and inputs/infrastructure, Teach on pedagogical practice, Global Early Child Development Database (GECDD) on school readiness of young children, and the Development World Management Survey (DWMS) on management quality—together with new questions to fill gaps in those instruments. Though the number of modules is similar to the full version of the Service Delivery Indicators (SDI) Survey, the number of items and the complexity of the questions within each module is significantly lower. The School Survey includes 8 short modules: School Information, Teacher Presence, Teacher Survey, Classroom Observation, Teacher Assessment, Early Learner Direct Assessment, School Management Survey, and 4th-grade Student Assessment. For a team of two enumerators, it takes on average about 4 hours to collect all information in a given school. For more information, refer to the Frequently Asked Questions.
• Policy Survey: The Policy Survey collects information to feed into the policy de jure indicators. This survey is filled out by key informants in each country, drawing on their knowledge to identify key elements of the policy framework (as in the SABER approach to policy-data collection that the Bank has used over the past 7 years). The survey includes questions on policies related to teachers, school management, inputs and infrastructure, and learners. In total, there are 52 questions in the survey as of June 2020. The key informant is expected to spend 2-3 days gathering and analyzing the relavant information to answer the survey questions.
• Survey of Public Officials: The Survey of Public Officials collects information about the capacity and orientation of the bureaucracy, as well as political factors affecting education outcomes. This survey is a streamlined and education-focused version of the civil-servant surveys that the Bureaucracy Lab (a joint initiative of the Governance Global Practice and the Development Impact Evaluation unit of the World Bank) has implemented in several countries. The survey includes questions about technical and leadership skills, work environment, stakeholder engagement, impartial decision-making, and attitudes and behaviors. The survey takes 30-45 minutes per public official and is used to interview Ministry of Education officials working at the central, regional, and district levels in each country.

While most dashboard indicators are derived from data collected using these instruments, the team also draws on existing data for a small number of indicators. This is particularly key for outcome data (school participation and learning), where the team reports existing data wherever possible. Similarly, because factors outside the education system also affect education outcomes, the dashboard also includes a few indicators based on existing data from other sectors. For example, many factors that affect whether children are in school and ready to learn lie outside the education system. Thus, policy levers for this practice area include indicators like the rate of children that are well-nourished and the share of children that are fully immunized, among others; these indicators draw on non-dashboard data sources. Please refer to the Detailed Indicator Information for more details.

Data Access and Licensing

This dataset is classified as Public under the Access to Information Classification Policy. Users inside and outside the Bank can access this dataset.

This dataset is licensed under CC-BY 4.0

CC-BY 4.0

Share Metadata

The information on this page (the dataset metadata) is also available in these formats.

PRINT EMAIL JSON RDF