Bangladesh - Building Parental Capacity to Help Child Development: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Save the Children Early Childhood Stimulation Program in Bangladesh 2015, Endline Survey

Primary tabs

Save the Children developed an early stimulation program that delivers actionable messages to mothers and other caregivers that show them how to interact and play with young children. The program also delivers a Child Development Card and two picture books, and instructions on how to use the card and the books to provide children with early learning opportunities. The program is low cost and potentially scalable because it builds on an existing delivery platform, and trains current community health care providers to deliver additional messages on early childhood stimulation practices.

Type: 
Microdata
Acronym: 
SCECSPIE-EL 2015
Languages Supported: 
English
Topics: 
Topic not specified
Geographical Coverage: 
Bangladesh
Economy Coverage: 
Economy Coverage not specified
Release Date: 
August 26, 2016

Last Updated

Last Updated: 
March 5, 2019

Harvest System ID

Harvest System ID: 
Microdata

Harvest Source ID

Harvest Source ID: 
8913
Reference ID: 

BGD_2015_SCECSPIE-EL_v01_M

Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Funding Name, Abbreviation, Role: 
Strategy Impact Evaluation Fund
Study Type: 
Other Household Survey
Series Information: 
Baseline data collection occurred between November 2013 and January 2014, and endline data collection occurred between September and December 2015.
Unit of Analysis: 
Households Individuals
Universe: 
Households with children between 3 and 18 months of age residing in the catchment area of participating community clinics at the time of baseline data collection.
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Marjorie Chinen - American Institutes for Research; Johannes Bos - American Institutes for Research
Sampling Procedure: 
Sampling of Households The study sample frame was generated from community clinic health assistant records, which had the advantage of being the centralized government document of record containing the population frame for all households with children under five years of age. The health assistant dataset included data for all three upazilas of interest. Of a total of 41 unions located in the three upazilas, 11 unions were excluded from the sampling frame. Six of these had incomplete data, and five were excluded because they had only one community clinic and the study design required each union to have at least two clinics. The final sample included 78 community clinics, located in 30 unions. Within the selected unions and community clinics, eligible households included those with children aged between 3 and 18 months who resided in selected community clinics' catchment areas during the baseline data collection period (November 2013-January 2014).We randomly sampled 33 households from each community clinic's catchment area to participate in the study. The sample was restricted to households with children aged three months or older because the main developmental assessment tool chosen for the evaluation (the Bayley-III; Bayley, 2006) had not been previously validated on children under the age of three months in Bangladesh. Furthermore, because the Bayley-III test is only valid for children up to the age of 42 months, we restricted the upper age limit of participating children to 18 months or younger at the time of baseline data collection in order to collect valid endline data 24 months later. Replacement The community clinic health assistant records were not up to date, so the team developed rules for replacing households that were found to be ineligible or "out-of-scope," as well as households that refused to participate. We randomly selected 20 additional replacement households from within each community clinic and included them in a separate list, with each household randomly sorted from 1 to 20. If one of the 33 households originally selected was found to be ineligible or refused to participate, the field interviewer replaced it with the first household from the 20-household replacement list, and continued replacing households in order thereafter. Overall, the majority of replacements were required because households were identified as ineligible, and only a few replacements were needed for households that refused to participate in the study (N = 39, or 1.5 percent of the sample). Households were ineligible if they did not fit the target sample description: "Households with children from 3-18 months of age that live in the selected community clinics' catchment areas during the period of the baseline data collection." This included: (a) households that had permanently left the catchment area (N = 300); (b) households with incorrect location information in the birth records (N = 291); (c) households with children who were ineligible due to inaccurate birth dates (N =173); and (d) households that were temporarily absent from the catchment area (N =159). For all 39 cases of refusal, the data collectors completed a non-complier questionnaire that captured some basic characteristics of this group to compare with the compliers.
Questionnaires: 
Instruments AIR, ICDDR,B, and Data International Ltd. worked with Save the Children, the World Bank, and the evaluation advisory board to develop the study instruments. The team developed the data collection instruments by drawing from existing national and international tools aligned with the evaluation's outcomes of interest. The core indicators included child development outcomes, anthropometric measures, and parenting stimulation questions, although the final instrument contained many more relevant indicators. Where possible, indicators were measured using questions and approaches that had already been field tested in Bangladesh to ensure that they were appropriate for the local context and the target populations. We also designed the instruments to be of a manageable length in order to avoid interviewer or respondent fatigue and ensure high-quality data. On average, the final survey instruments took 30 minutes to complete. Endline data collection tools resembled the instruments used at baseline. As discussed above, some instruments were modified slightly based on lessons learned during baseline data collection and monitoring data collection. The non-compliance survey was not administered at endline. Two new measures were added during endline: the Wolke Behavioral Rating Scale, which measures children's behavior during the Bayley-III; and a focus group protocol, with fathers and mothers grouped separately.
Access Authority Name, Affiliation, Email: 

Shinsaku Nomura, World Bank, [email protected]

Time Periods: 
August, 2017

No Visualizations Available.

Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download Example: Marjorie Chinen, American Institutes for Research, Johanes Bos, American Institutes for Research. Building Parental Capacity to Help Child Development: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Save the Children Early Childhood Stimulation Program in Bangladesh 2013-2014, Endline Survey. Ref. BGD_2015_SCECSPIE-EL_v01_M. Dataset downloaded from [URL] on [date].

Save the Children developed an early stimulation program that delivers actionable messages to mothers and other caregivers that show them how to interact and play with young children. The program also delivers a Child Development Card and two picture books, and instructions on how to use the card and the books to provide children with early learning opportunities. The program is low cost and potentially scalable because it builds on an existing delivery platform, and trains current community health care providers to deliver additional messages on early childhood stimulation practices.

FieldValue
Modified Date
2019-03-08
Release Date
Identifier
c17ce711-d37e-4bee-af0c-279ec36c862a
License
License Not Specified
Contact Email
Rating: 
0
No votes yet
Reference ID: 
BGD_2015_SCECSPIE-EL_v01_M
Acronym: 
SCECSPIE-EL 2015
Type: 
Languages Supported: 
Access Authority Name, Affiliation, Email: 
Shinsaku Nomura, World Bank, [email protected]
Disclaimer: 
The user of the data acknowledges that the original collector of the data, the authorized distributor of the data, and the relevant funding agency bear no responsibility for use of the data or for interpretations or inferences based upon such uses.
Time Periods: 
August, 2017
Economy Coverage: 
Primary Investigator Name, Affiliation: 
Marjorie Chinen - American Institutes for Research; Johannes Bos - American Institutes for Research
Funding Name, Abbreviation, Role: 
Strategy Impact Evaluation Fund
Terms of Use: 
Subtitle: 
Endline Survey
Unit of Analysis: 
Households Individuals
Universe: 
Households with children between 3 and 18 months of age residing in the catchment area of participating community clinics at the time of baseline data collection.
Geographical Coverage: 
Data Classification of a Dataset: 
Series Information: 
Baseline data collection occurred between November 2013 and January 2014, and endline data collection occurred between September and December 2015.
Sampling Procedure: 
Sampling of Households The study sample frame was generated from community clinic health assistant records, which had the advantage of being the centralized government document of record containing the population frame for all households with children under five years of age. The health assistant dataset included data for all three upazilas of interest. Of a total of 41 unions located in the three upazilas, 11 unions were excluded from the sampling frame. Six of these had incomplete data, and five were excluded because they had only one community clinic and the study design required each union to have at least two clinics. The final sample included 78 community clinics, located in 30 unions. Within the selected unions and community clinics, eligible households included those with children aged between 3 and 18 months who resided in selected community clinics' catchment areas during the baseline data collection period (November 2013-January 2014).We randomly sampled 33 households from each community clinic's catchment area to participate in the study. The sample was restricted to households with children aged three months or older because the main developmental assessment tool chosen for the evaluation (the Bayley-III; Bayley, 2006) had not been previously validated on children under the age of three months in Bangladesh. Furthermore, because the Bayley-III test is only valid for children up to the age of 42 months, we restricted the upper age limit of participating children to 18 months or younger at the time of baseline data collection in order to collect valid endline data 24 months later. Replacement The community clinic health assistant records were not up to date, so the team developed rules for replacing households that were found to be ineligible or "out-of-scope," as well as households that refused to participate. We randomly selected 20 additional replacement households from within each community clinic and included them in a separate list, with each household randomly sorted from 1 to 20. If one of the 33 households originally selected was found to be ineligible or refused to participate, the field interviewer replaced it with the first household from the 20-household replacement list, and continued replacing households in order thereafter. Overall, the majority of replacements were required because households were identified as ineligible, and only a few replacements were needed for households that refused to participate in the study (N = 39, or 1.5 percent of the sample). Households were ineligible if they did not fit the target sample description: "Households with children from 3-18 months of age that live in the selected community clinics' catchment areas during the period of the baseline data collection." This included: (a) households that had permanently left the catchment area (N = 300); (b) households with incorrect location information in the birth records (N = 291); (c) households with children who were ineligible due to inaccurate birth dates (N =173); and (d) households that were temporarily absent from the catchment area (N =159). For all 39 cases of refusal, the data collectors completed a non-complier questionnaire that captured some basic characteristics of this group to compare with the compliers.
Release Date: 
Friday, August 26, 2016
Last Updated Date: 
Tuesday, March 5, 2019
Questionnaires: 
Instruments AIR, ICDDR,B, and Data International Ltd. worked with Save the Children, the World Bank, and the evaluation advisory board to develop the study instruments. The team developed the data collection instruments by drawing from existing national and international tools aligned with the evaluation's outcomes of interest. The core indicators included child development outcomes, anthropometric measures, and parenting stimulation questions, although the final instrument contained many more relevant indicators. Where possible, indicators were measured using questions and approaches that had already been field tested in Bangladesh to ensure that they were appropriate for the local context and the target populations. We also designed the instruments to be of a manageable length in order to avoid interviewer or respondent fatigue and ensure high-quality data. On average, the final survey instruments took 30 minutes to complete. Endline data collection tools resembled the instruments used at baseline. As discussed above, some instruments were modified slightly based on lessons learned during baseline data collection and monitoring data collection. The non-compliance survey was not administered at endline. Two new measures were added during endline: the Wolke Behavioral Rating Scale, which measures children's behavior during the Bayley-III; and a focus group protocol, with fathers and mothers grouped separately.
Harvest Source: 
Harvest System ID: 
8913
Citation Text: 
Use of the dataset must be acknowledged using a citation which would include: - the Identification of the Primary Investigator - the title of the survey (including country, acronym and year of implementation) - the survey reference number - the source and date of download Example: Marjorie Chinen, American Institutes for Research, Johanes Bos, American Institutes for Research. Building Parental Capacity to Help Child Development: A Randomized Controlled Trial of the Save the Children Early Childhood Stimulation Program in Bangladesh 2013-2014, Endline Survey. Ref. BGD_2015_SCECSPIE-EL_v01_M. Dataset downloaded from [URL] on [date].
Modified date: 
17960
Study Type: 
Other Household Survey
Primary Dataset: 
Yes
Mode of Data Collection: 

Face-to-face

Data Access and Licensing

This dataset is classified as Public under the Access to Information Classification Policy. Users inside and outside the Bank can access this dataset.

This dataset is made available under the World Bank Microdata Research License

Share Metadata

The information on this page (the dataset metadata) is also available in these formats.

PRINT EMAIL JSON RDF